Author Topic: Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine  (Read 558 times)

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Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine
« on: Aug 10, 2022, 04:55 PM »
I am sure we have all been following the tough negotiations and the daring ships finally bringing grain out of Ukraine, past sea mines and past strict controls and inspections in Istanbul.

Like probably most of you, I have been looking at the pictures of the ships that are now making this perilous voyage. Just a few of them are listed here :

Razoni
Polarnet
Navi-Star
Rojen
Fulmar S
Glory
Riva Wind
Star Helena
Mustafa Necati

There is a good video of the departure of the very first ship, Razoni, here :

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/rcna41890

RTÉ, the Irish broadcaster, had a fascinating interview with a representative of the owner of the cargo on Navi-Star, bound for Ireland as cattle feed. He told listeners that Navi-Star had arrived in Odessa the very day that Russia invaded Ukraine, and that the ship and the crew had been waiting all this time to be able to leave again...

I am fascinated by the looks of these ships. Here is Razoni :

https://www.vesselfinder.com/vessels/RAZONI-IMO-9086526-MMSI-667001963

It seems to have a lengthy array of cranes, one behind the other.

https://www.vesselfinder.com/vessels/NAVI-STAR-IMO-9590979-MMSI-354180000

And this is Navi-Star, which I am glad to see had arrived in Ringaskiddy (Ireland).

Could someone explain how these ships work? Are these cranes, and if so, what do they do?

Online Andy Holloway

Re: Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine
« Reply #1 on: Aug 11, 2022, 08:22 AM »
Simply put the cranes are for loading whatever cargo she's contracted to carry, not every berth/port has the same, or any, dedicated loading facilities as the main ports do, so these ships as 'general cargo' bulk carriers need to be able to load and unload cargo wherever, hence she has her own cranes.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine
« Reply #2 on: Aug 11, 2022, 09:24 AM »
Simply put the cranes are for loading whatever cargo she's contracted to carry, not every berth/port has the same, or any, dedicated loading facilities as the main ports do, so these ships as 'general cargo' bulk carriers need to be able to load and unload cargo wherever, hence she has her own cranes.

Thank you very much, Andy, that makes a lot of sense.

Are there deep holds between each of these cranes? I imagine the grain could dumped in each of them without any further packaging, and then covered by a moveable roof? Or would all the grain already be packaged somehow, making it easier to unload it?

I also wonder how many of these ships will want to return to Ukraine to pick up more grain and provide an essential service to both sellers and buyers?

Online Andy Holloway

Re: Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine
« Reply #3 on: Aug 11, 2022, 08:13 PM »
Thank you very much, Andy, that makes a lot of sense.

Are there deep holds between each of these cranes? I imagine the grain could dumped in each of them without any further packaging, and then covered by a moveable roof? Or would all the grain already be packaged somehow, making it easier to unload it?

I also wonder how many of these ships will want to return to Ukraine to pick up more grain and provide an essential service to both sellers and buyers?
The grain will be 'free loaded' into the - possibly - 5 holds it looks like she has. Loading is a very delicate operation as you have to respect stability at all times and load evenly, or you'll capsize! Once each hold is full then the heavy hatch covers will be moved into place and secured making the hold watertight. All the grain will either be grab loaded from waiting lorries or, more possibly in a major grain exporting port, fed from nearby silos via a conveyor belt system.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Bulk carriers shipping grain out of Ukraine
« Reply #4 on: Aug 12, 2022, 09:39 AM »
The grain will be 'free loaded' into the - possibly - 5 holds it looks like she has. Loading is a very delicate operation as you have to respect stability at all times and load evenly, or you'll capsize! Once each hold is full then the heavy hatch covers will be moved into place and secured making the hold watertight. All the grain will either be grab loaded from waiting lorries or, more possibly in a major grain exporting port, fed from nearby silos via a conveyor belt system.

That is great! Thank you, Andy, for this clear description and mental picture. We shall never know whether Navi-Star already had her load on board when the invasion happened, so that the grain stayed in this position for five months or more. Presumably it would have been quite safe from the weather (if not the war) during all this time. I hope the crew did not have too hard a time.