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Author Topic: QE2 Slides preserved and researched by Brian Price, Cruise Director.  (Read 2509 times)

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Online Lynda Bradford

Hope you are enjoying seeing these fantastic QE2 slides.  Brian Price has sent these photos for this month's instalment. 

And so now on to the turbines....
First the high pressure turbine:
This rotor with its blades is installed into a casing to ensure that the steam produced by the Foster Wheeler boilers passes through the turbine blades making the rotor spin. The quantity of the steam is controlled in the Turbine Control Room where the Officer on duty makes the ship go faster, slower, forwards or astern by releasing steam into the turbines.
The steam has been heated to 510 degrees C and pressurised to 850 psi, and will make the high pressure turbine spin at 5000 rpm.

In the picture you see the high pressure turbine is being lowered by a piece of ‘old rope’ into the lower half of the PH Turbine Casing.
 
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Online Lynda Bradford

and here is the second photo for this month's instalment and the extract from Brian's notes:

The steam loses some pressure after it has passed through the HP Turbine, but still contains valuable energy which can be used in a turbine with much larger blades....The Low Pressure Turbine.

The Low Pressure Turbine has two separate sets of blades for AHEAD and ASTERN. This turbine will rotate at 3300 rpm.
 
The turbines were designed and built by PARMATRADA of Wallsend. The port side engine and starboard side engine each comprised a High Pressure Turbine and a Low Pressure Turbine contained in their own casings and connected to a port and starboard double reduction gears.
 
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Mauretania1907

Ive been sorting my books and now reading Potter and Frost's book QE2, which has a lot about the design and building of the ship and the fact that Cunard was in dire financial troubles at the time (not to mention John Brown shipyard) They do not mention the 'teething troubles' she had.

Offline June Ingram

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These are amazing photos to see and thanks very much for the technical details !   :)
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Online Lynda Bradford

Thanks to Brian Price for continuing to let us see the QE2 slides he had rescued.  This month he continues with photos and comments on the images.  These photos would have been taken in John Brown Engineering workshop in Clydebank.

Quote
Brian Price

The Double Reduction Gear Housing.....
 
The high pressure turbine runs at 5000 rpm, and the low pressure turbine runs at 3300 rpm. These have to be reduced to approximately 132 rpm which is required for the shaft rotation speed.
 
This process is achieved in the Double Reduction Gear Housing.

Photo 1:

"Pictured here, standing on end is the double reduction gear housing. Front at the top, rear at the bottom.  Inside this housing will run the gears that  will reduce the turbine speeds to that which is required at the propeller shaft. Turbines go in at one end and the propeller shaft out at the opposite end."



"The process being completed here is tooth cutting on the main ‘Bull’ gear. You can’t miss the Yard Number ‘736’ casually chalked on the side of the gear. This gear turns at the same speed as the propeller."



I know nothing about engineering but I appreciate the skills at the John Brown's Engineering Works in Clydebank, which would be a topic on it's own. 

Looking forward to hearing your comments and I know that Brian Price appreciates getting information from forum members who have first hand knowledge of QE2 engines and turbines. 

More photos will be posted over the weekend. 
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Online Lynda Bradford

More photos....

"Here the ‘Bull’ gear is lying on it’s side while the double helical (herringbone) gears are cut and checked. In this next picture we see the secondary pinion wheels being checked again."





"Then finally, The Meshing Test: all the gears are coated in black and assembled in the Double Reduction Gear Housing. The gears are then run and any incorrect measurements in the manufacture process can be detected by the black coating rubbing off.
 
The next instalment.....you’ll see the entire Port Side Engine assembled, but still in the workshop."
 
Please post to let Brian know that you are enjoying these unique pictures.


I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

These are fascinating pictures, and what a miracle it is that they have been preserved for us to marvel at!

Great thanks to Brian for making them available and adding the information which helps us to understand them. Thanks also to Lynda for posting them and keeping the topic flowing.

While I am ignorant of the machinery, I am hugely enjoying the pictures and stories around them.

Online Lynda Bradford

It is amazing to see the men working on the gears and the detail is amazing.   I wonder if anyone recognises the workers!
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Online Lynda Bradford

...and here is another fantastic photo that Brian sent this afternoon.

He wrote:

"Here’s the next instalment....
 
Having seen the construction of the boilers turbines and double reduction gears in the last few pictures....... here’s a unique photograph of the port side engine of QE2. It is pictured here in John Brown’s workshop, and all of the components of the engine have been assembled so that it can be ‘bench tested’ prior to it’s placement into the ship.
 
The size of this engine becomes even more apparent if you make a comparison with the four men pictured around the engine."



"At the top of the picture with its curved casing is the low pressure turbine (3,300 rpm), to its right on the inboard side of the engine is the silver casing of the high pressure turbine (5,000 rpm), and in the centre of the picture, the sloping sides of the double reduction gearbox which in its turn,  produced a shaft speed of 132 rpm). This engine produced 55,000 shaft horsepower. Together, both engines produced 110,000 shaft horsepower. I think that’s about the equivalent of about 140 Ferraris 812 Superfasts running at 8,500 rpm!!"
 
Big question....... what happened to them after they were taken out of the ship in Germany and replaced with diesel electric engines?
 
Does anyone know the answer?

Hope, that like me, you are looking forward to seeing more of Brian's collection of QE2 slides. 

 
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Rod

Fascinating! Just fascinating

Offline Thomas Hypher

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Big question....... what happened to them after they were taken out of the ship in Germany and replaced with diesel electric engines?
 
Does anyone know the answer?

I gather all of the steam turbine plant's machinery was disposed of as scrap metal. One pair of propellers went to Kiel for display and another pair were melted down into limited edition golf clubs or at least this is what I've read.
First travelled on QE2 in August 2003 aged 6 years old. Last stepped foot and travelled on QE2 in July 2008. Last saw QE2 in person from the decks of QM2, on QE2's last Transatlantic crossing (Eastbound tandem) in October 2008 - we had the better view!

Online Michael Gallagher

Cunard was hoping that a museum in the UK would be interested in taking some of the redundant machinery but none showed any interest when approached.

Some of the turbine blades were cut into pieces and mounted on individual clear plastic mounts and were given away as souvenirs by Cunard.

QE2’s first set of propellers remained with the ship throughout her time as a steamship but her 1986 / 1987 re-engining would see them replaced by a new set of controllable pitch five-bladed propellers from the Dutch firm of LIPS.

It was reported that the years of service and rotating through the water had reduced the diameter of the propellers by 1.5 inches.

One propeller was originally to be retained as a dockland exhibit in England but that plan never materialised while the other propeller is suspected to have been melted down by LIPS with the metal being recast into other propellers.

Kiel

In 1987 one of the propellers was saved by German entrepreneur Berni Schweda who gave it to the City of Kiel where, since 1990, it now resides on the east river bank. There are no signposts or plaques about it and it appeared in a sorry state in 2018.

It WASN'T these propellers which became the golf materials - it was actually the spare set which had been produced in the 1960s and had lain in Southampton ready for use as and when.


See topic When visiting Kiel Germany - QE2 Propellers
« Last Edit: May 01, 2020, 09:47 AM by Lynda Bradford »

Offline June Ingram

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Many thanks for the amazing photos and commentary !   :)
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline Clydebuilt1971

Great photos and commentary.

These tell not only the story of the building of QE2 but also of the skill and capability of Clydeside at that time.

Keep em comin!!

Gav

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

In Lynda's absence, here is the next series of Brian Price's wonderful photos. Thank you so much, Brian, for the  photos and the description following hereunder.



The Michell Thrust Bearing



The Michell Thrust bearing is one of the most important parts of the propulsion system. There’s a thrust bearing at the top end of each propeller shaft, just behind the double reduction gearbox.
QE2’s main thrust bearings were manufactured by a South Shields Company.....Michell Bearings.
 
During one of my presentations I was asked a question about the main engine bearings – and I was not too sure if I had given the correct answer. When I got home I Googled ‘Michell Bearings’ and called the company to see how close I had been to giving out the right answer to the question. I was ‘put through’ to the CEO who was delighted to hear that I had slides of his bearings and had been giving talks about the QE2 engines. He not only confirmed that I had been giving out the correct information, but also provided me with drawings of the bearings.
 
DEFINITION AS PROVIDED
Michell Hydrodynamic bearings.
Neither plate or roller type bearings.
Incompressible oil between one rotating and one static plates.
Frictionless, but with gradual power loss caused by shearing of the oil film.
 
Inside the bearing is a circular plate/collar which is attached to, and rotates with the propeller shaft. In front of that is another circular collar around the propeller shaft which is static (not rotating). In between the two there is a incompressible film of oil. It is at this point that the enormous energy created by the rotating blades of the propellers (and delivered back up the propeller shaft) is diverted down to the hull of the ship.
 
If it were not for these bearings, that energy would go back into the engine.



Further aft, between storage tanks, one of the two propeller shafts is clearly seen in the background. As mentioned before, the shaft was constructed in sections for ease of removal / replacement if necessary, and rotated at a speed of approximately 132 RPM (on a good day).
 
Coming Up......The Main Control Room and Argus 400 computer.

Offline June Ingram

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Many thanks, Brian, for sharing with us your awesome photos and the commentary for the photos.  It is an extraordinary opportunity to see these photos of QE2 !  Many thanks to Isabelle for posting them here for us to see !   :)
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Online Lynda Bradford

A big thank-you to Brian Price for this latest instalment of photos.  These may bring back memories for our Engineers who were on QE2 during her early years.  If you recognised any of the faces please post so that we can put names to faces. 

1:  The MCR or to give it’s full tile The Main Control Room where all technical functions (including the contents of the storerooms) of the ship were controlled and monitored......a few familiar faces here!



2: The Main Electrical Power Station.
Electricity is produced by 3 turbo alternators using steam from the 3 Foster Wheeler boilers at an initial voltage of 3,300 each. Electricity is then delivered at 440v and then reduced to 220v and 110v for domestic use around the ship. In it’s early days it was said that the 5.5 megawatts that could be produced by QE2 was enough to light the city of Southampton.
 


3: Checking the printout of the Argus 400 computer which is housed in the room at the rear of this picture.
The Argus 400 system was made by Ferranti and named in line with their policy of naming computers after Greek gods. It was designed in the 1960’s with potential use mostly in the military field. Please note: Rob has posted an item with all the intricate details of the Argus 400 computer.



You can read more about the computer on QE2's computer Ferranti Argus 400 topic

Brian mentioned that the next instalment will be "The TCR" no idea what what is but sure looking forward to finding out. 


« Last Edit: Mar 25, 2020, 09:46 AM by Lynda Bradford »
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Rod

Very early photos! The gentleman with 2 stripes and a lack of hair is Brian Gregory, later on he became Staff Chief, maybe Chief.
TCR is Turbine Control Room.

Offline Clydebuilt1971

I wonder if it was a company local to the builder who made those control panels and switchgear for the control rooms?

Back in the day there were hundreds of suppliers who could do just that and more.
« Last Edit: Mar 23, 2020, 01:36 PM by Clydebuilt1971 »

Offline June Ingram

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These are just wonderful photos ! Thanks very much to Brian Price for providing them and to Lynda for posting them !  :)
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

 

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