Author Topic: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing  (Read 28422 times)

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Offline Willum

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #40 on: May 05, 2014, 04:53 PM »
John Chillingworth - former Chief Engineer ran a company called Fibrecheck that used to safely remove Asbestos from ships so he knows a lot about the subject. Marinite was used for deckheads and bulkheads and I for one used to drill it for running cables etc without the risk being appreciated. Marinite was a kind of a sandwich of asbestos between formica. However very many of these panels were cracked, particularly on one occasion in Boston when the temperature dropped to way below zero, the aluminium superstructure contracted and the marinite panels squeezed and BANG they would snap. The lift shafts were lined with a different grade of the stuff but this time the asbestos was not protected by the laminate. 
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Offline Adam Hodson

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #41 on: May 05, 2014, 07:01 PM »
The lift shafts were lined with a different grade of the stuff but this time the asbestos was not protected by the laminate. 

If I am correct the lifts were lined in blue asbestos.
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Offline Hank Hargrove

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Re: Asbestos Removal?
« Reply #42 on: May 07, 2014, 03:42 AM »
Some of it will have been disturbed/removed in 1986/1987 when they rebuilt her engine rooms etc. but the vast majority will still be there.

Asbestos is only a problem if it is disturbed, and turns to dust etc, as long as they left it alone, it didn't matter.

The recent refit of the "Rotterdam" for her static role as a hotel raised the same issues - I believe they removed all her asbestos while also then managing to replace most of her original interiors, presumably with modern fireproofing material.

So removed everything and then reassemble it after the asbestos was removed? I was pretty sure that's what they did...Just checking.
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Offline Hank Hargrove

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #43 on: May 07, 2014, 03:47 AM »
This is unrelated to QE2's asbestos but it reminds me of the ghost town of Wittenoom, Australia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wittenoom,_Western_Australia
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Offline Adam Hodson

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Re: Asbestos Removal?
« Reply #44 on: May 07, 2014, 07:53 AM »
So removed everything and then reassemble it after the asbestos was removed? I was pretty sure that's what they did...Just checking.

Hi Hank. They will have removed all the asbestos from where they could and were working working (the engine room etc.) but the rest of the ship would probably be remained untouched.
"The QE2 is one of the last great transatlantic liners, and arguably the most famous liner in the world"

"QE2 and Concorde, a partnership that lasted almost 30 years... two stunning pieces of engineering, never to be forgotten!"

Offline June Ingram

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #45 on: Sep 25, 2014, 02:45 PM »
John Chillingworth - former Chief Engineer ran a company called Fibrecheck that used to safely remove Asbestos from ships so he knows a lot about the subject. 

What is the actual step by step procedure to safely remove asbestos from a ship, and what is done with the asbestos after its removal ?

Thanks,

June
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Offline Willum

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #46 on: Sep 28, 2014, 01:38 PM »
What is the actual step by step procedure to safely remove asbestos from a ship, and what is done with the asbestos after its removal ?

Thanks,

June

Well I'm no expert but during asbestos removal operations the area was sealed off with polythene and tape and an industrial vacuum cleaner was used. The key was to keep the space in a lower air pressure than the surroundings by maintaining a separate air pump with filters to prevent air escaping. The operatives had breathing apparatus and disposable overalls. The main thing is to disturb it as little as possible. That which could be carried was removed to a container, again depressurised. No idea what happened to it once it was taken away, Landfill probably - only joking - or am I?
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Online Rod

Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #47 on: Sep 28, 2014, 06:53 PM »
On Disney property, here in Kissimmee. There are 7 containers of asbestos just buried in the ground.

Offline June Ingram

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #48 on: Sep 29, 2014, 04:50 PM »
Thank you, Willum and Rod, for your replies.  The more "advanced" we become, the more dangerous things there are with which to deal.
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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #50 on: Dec 07, 2014, 04:21 PM »
In the US a favorite way of finishing ceilings, is some stuff called "popcorn". It is sprayed on and covers many defects on the wallboard.
 In many older buildings the popcorn was made of an asbestos derivative!.
One of my old hotels required over $5M in asbestos removal before they demolished the hotel!

Offline Hank Hargrove

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #51 on: Dec 13, 2014, 07:59 AM »

In the US a favorite way of finishing ceilings, is some stuff called "popcorn". It is sprayed on and covers many defects on the wallboard.
 In many older buildings the popcorn was made of an asbestos derivative!.
One of my old hotels required over $5M in asbestos removal before they demolished the hotel!

I've been around Newer popcorn ceilings, but never old asbestos popcorn ceilings (to my knowledge anyhow).
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Offline Adam Hodson

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #52 on: Dec 14, 2014, 09:10 PM »
"The QE2 is one of the last great transatlantic liners, and arguably the most famous liner in the world"

"QE2 and Concorde, a partnership that lasted almost 30 years... two stunning pieces of engineering, never to be forgotten!"

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #53 on: Jan 11, 2015, 11:27 PM »
http://www.motorship.com/news101/regulation-and-classification/85-of-new-ships-still-contain-asbestos

They still find asbestos in new ships

Interesting to note a certain QE2 Chief Engineer mentioned in that article!
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I have received a message from a lawyer, and agreed to post it here.

Quote
I am a marine lawyer instructed to act on behalf of Cunard in relation to an asbestos claim brought by a steward who served on board the “Queen Mary” from 1960 to 1967 and then on board the “Queen Elizabeth II” from 1967 to 1971.

Asbestos exposure is alleged from pipes in  cabins, toilets and alleyways of the “Queen Mary” and “Queen Elizabeth II”. I am looking for a witness who can help me with my investigations in order to ascertain whether or not these allegations are likely to be correct and hope that someone will be able to assist? 

If you would like to assist, please reply to this and I will pass your message and contact details on to the lawyer.
« Last Edit: Jul 20, 2020, 09:50 AM by Lynda Bradford »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 37 years and creator of this website.  Worked in IT for 27 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Online skilly56

Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #55 on: Jul 18, 2020, 02:57 PM »
Asbestos is usually found in 'MARINITE' - a panelling sheet that was commonly used in the internal bulkheads of ships cabins, service rooms, galleys, etc. 4 bulk cement carriers I served on (all built in Scotland, 1953/54, 1960, 1964, and 1978/79) used this material. It was also used in the galley deck heads, mainly due to it's fire-resistant properties. On the 1978/79 ship, I manufactured Asbestos Warning labels from self-adhesive vinyl to warn people not to chip or drill through the panels.

As for use in ships today - I have crewed on numerous off-shore vessels (mainly built in Asia) where, in the Ship's Certificates Folder, is a lovely embossed document stating there is NO asbestos used anywhere on this vessel.

Then one goes down to the engine room store, where there are rows of studs on a bulkhead, and dozens of machinery & pipe joints (gaskets) are hanging from these studs. The material they are manufactured from has the words 'ASBESTOS' stamped or printed right across the joints!

And yet there is an Asbestos-Free Certificate in the Bridge folder!

Trying to get the vessel owner to replace all the asbestos material was mission impossible. They didn't actually want to understand the problem!


Have to laugh - I read the article by JC after I wrote my post above. We are both on the same page.
« Last Edit: Jul 19, 2020, 07:15 AM by skilly56 »

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: QE2 Asbestos and Fireproofing
« Reply #56 on: Jul 18, 2020, 03:37 PM »
I have received a message from a lawyer, and agreed to post it here.

If you would like to assist, please reply to this and I will pass your message and contact details on to the lawyer.

The lawyer will find lots of information on this topic.  I had previously posted about the paper on Asbestos in Scotland and the Clydeside Action on Asbestos Group.  He may want to have a look and consider contacting the group.  https://www.theqe2story.com/forum/index.php?topic=658.msg45601#msg45601


Quote
This paper "Asbestos in Scotland" written by Thomas Gorman, Ronnie Johnston, Arthur McIvor, Andrew Watterson outlines the Asbestos hazzard in Scotland. 
https://dspace.stir.ac.uk/bitstream/1893/602/1/Watterson%20-%20Asbestos%20in%20Scotland.pdf

At the bottom of the paper there are acknowledgement to organisations who provided information.  It may be worthwhile contacting them as they may have already researched the information you are looking for.

"The authors thank the oral history respondents, as well as staff at Clydeside Action on Asbestos, Clydebank Asbestos Group, ISD, and COSLA who provided much of the information on which this paper is based".

Have you also contacted the Westminster and Scottish Parliament to see if they have any research material available?
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Offline Boris

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Re: Asbestos & Fireproofing
« Reply #57 on: Jul 20, 2020, 04:22 AM »
If we knew then what we know now!
But, to be honest, we suspected, even back then. I recall back in the early 70s an aircon engineer on board was telling me that the aircon ducts in our cabins all had layers of asbestos dust sitting in them: he thought this dust arose from when the Marinite bulkheads and deckheads were first sawn and fitted at the time of the build. But as others on this board have mentioned, the dust could have increased as bulkheads fractured or people drilled holes into the Marinite.
How it settled into the ducts, I can't comment.
« Last Edit: Jul 20, 2020, 05:02 AM by Boris »