Author Topic: Ships in stormy seas  (Read 18239 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 12241
  • Total likes: 15596
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
« Last Edit: Aug 06, 2011, 06:08 PM by Isabelle Prondzynski »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline QE2_MATTHEW

Re: They'd have been fine on the QE2!
« Reply #1 on: Jan 29, 2009, 10:00 PM »
Of course they would. I faced similar conditions on the Atlantic in 2002, we had to go off course on a southerly route yet still caught a good ride.  :P
Im free...

Offline Andy F

Re: They'd have been fine on the QE2!
« Reply #2 on: Jan 30, 2009, 12:26 AM »
Amazing shots though.  Good find Rob
Start every day with a smile and get it over with

Offline Twynkle

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #3 on: Apr 05, 2009, 06:48 PM »
I came across this...




and wondered about memories - more hazy, perhaps!


(I know the vid isn't about the QE2...maybe this one'll not last long!)

Video - Credit to etmackay - and thanks too, to all incredibly brave Seafarers.
« Last Edit: Sep 22, 2009, 12:27 PM by Twynkle »

KEV

  • Guest
Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #4 on: Apr 06, 2009, 01:41 PM »
 Doubt if the crew were playing snooker here!


I used to work offshore and always thought seafarers are brave whatever the size and type of vessel. Look at the Trawler series on TV for instance. The larger the vessel you would think in theory the better its ability to cope but doesnt always bear true and of course lifeboats are designed for the worst conditions. Theres some quite spectacular footage on youtube of some cruise ships rolling around but fortunately its the exception rather than the rule. I do think though that QE2 was the best design for such conditions . To recall Capt Perkins in our Force 10 Channel/Normandy/Biscay  words to the effect of " Apologies to Passengers for the slightly bumpy ride but rest assured that you are on the best ship in the world to cope with such conditions"
« Last Edit: Apr 06, 2009, 03:04 PM by Kev »

Offline Andy F

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #5 on: Apr 06, 2009, 10:24 PM »
Agree Kev and while clearly the bigger the vessel the greater protection they afford, even they are not immune, as the amazing shots of QV's first T/A crossing show. 
Agree also the Trawlermen series was compelling viewing and made you appreciate just what those guys go through (ditto RNLI). 

 

Start every day with a smile and get it over with

Offline Twynkle

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #6 on: Apr 06, 2009, 10:58 PM »



Not sure how Guests on the qe3 will manage when conditions change during a game of croquet - or bowls, even. ..?

Offline Andy F

scary video of voyager ship in storm
« Reply #7 on: Apr 08, 2009, 09:30 PM »
Incidently, I cannot find Voyager in the 2008 Berlitz Cruise Guide, so has she been withdrawn since.

The last I heard, she was operating for Iberojet Cruises under the name Voyager or Grand Voyager and based in the Med.  Not sure of her current whereabouts though.  I think the dramatic vid Kev posted was taken in 2005 when she was caught in a storm and lost power while off the coast of Menorca en route to Barcelona.  Scary stuff indeed
Start every day with a smile and get it over with

Offline Mauretania1907

scary video of voyager ship in storm
« Reply #8 on: Apr 09, 2009, 08:03 AM »
Yes, I retired with my Berlitz Guide and found two ships Grand Voyager, formerly Olympia voyager, first name Olympic Voyager, built July 2000 by Blohm and Voss, Germany. Unusual to have a fairly new ship lose all power and I wouldn't like the engineers job in seas like that. I bet they cursed every inch of her. Another ship of similar looks is Delphin Voyager, ex Orient Venus built by Ishikawjima Heavy Industries, Japan in 1990. Now operated by Delphin Cruises, she caters for German-speaking clientiele.
Delpin V is 21,884 GRT and Grand V is 24,391GRT. Grand V caters for Spanish clientiele
who were probably either praying for calmer seas, or for the bloody ship to sink so they could die!

Offline Mauretania1907

scary video of voyager ship in storm
« Reply #9 on: Apr 09, 2009, 08:18 AM »
Yes, definitely Grand Voyager, the poor girl wasn't so flash that particular day. If I were the captain, I'd give her a great boot up the stern for breaking down and then a fervent kiss for staying afloat (I can't swim, not that you'd last more than a minute in those seas) AND my engineers would get a large tot of rum, once they got the 'bitch' going once more.

Offline Stowaway2k

scary video of voyager ship in storm
« Reply #10 on: Apr 09, 2009, 05:11 PM »
Inside Voyager during the cyclone...
wait for after the passenger interviews, as the first few clips are from that Semester at Sea ship, Explorer, in 2005
It's in Spanish, but that doesn't matter...


MV Explorer
   
Here is the Oceanos sinking off South Africa
   

Offline Jem

Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #11 on: Oct 26, 2009, 04:42 AM »
Found this selection here:   http://www.solentwaters.co.uk/Videos/roughseas.html
Not for the feint hearted!! :o
« Last Edit: Jan 11, 2010, 11:36 PM by Rob Lightbody »

Offline highlander0108

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #12 on: Oct 27, 2009, 02:21 AM »
Nice find!  It was a slog to download and view, but parts were enjoyable and downright shocking.  The ship in the beginning plowing through the heavy seas was nice to watch, but I am also the type that specifically booked a winter crossing on QE2 to experience rough weather. ;D 

Ken
"There will never be another one like her" QE2's last Master Ian McNaught
My Blog:  http://qe2-prideoftheclyde.blogspot.com/

Offline pete cain

Had to post this one
« Reply #13 on: Nov 11, 2009, 04:53 PM »
 Once again thankyou to youtube, I,m still trawling my way through  for QE2 related items & came across this thought about our vikki feeling the swell across the Atlantic. If you decide to watch, do it all the way through IT,S  REALLY SCARY...

« Last Edit: Nov 11, 2009, 05:12 PM by Isabelle Prondzynski »

Offline Mauretania1907

Re: Had to post this one
« Reply #14 on: Nov 12, 2009, 06:54 AM »
Which ship was this? Looks like the party was pooped.

Offline pete cain

Re: Had to post this one
« Reply #15 on: Nov 12, 2009, 11:06 AM »
Havn't been able to find out yet , but am glad I wasn't there (bet it was a block of flats  on top of a hull though)

Offline andy liney

Re: Had to post this one
« Reply #16 on: Nov 13, 2009, 02:02 PM »
It looks like the one that was featured elsewhere on this site (a pale blue-hulled ship in the Med., which lost power when a wave hit the bridge, and was one of two sister ships - the other had similar problems off Alaska). I can't recall the name, but another of the videos of her that I found contained a brief still from what looked like the same restaurant. Not a floating block of flats as it happens, but obviously "out of its depth" so to speak, in the conditions.

Having said that, I was on the QE2 transatlantic in bad weather when a freak beam wave hit her towards her stern, with water washing into the pools, and there was quite a lot of damage in the Lido with food everywhere, furniture overturned, and several injuries including a couple of broken limbs and a few dislocated fingers etc.

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #17 on: Feb 11, 2010, 05:42 PM »
Were you there?!
Thanks to natalleh2003

Online Peter Mugridge

  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3583
  • Total likes: 3406
  • At Mach 2 three days after being on QE2...
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #18 on: Feb 11, 2010, 11:40 PM »
"TAXI!!! - Follow that liner!!" ;D
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Offline jdl

  • Britannia Grill Diner
  • ****
  • Posts: 279
  • Total likes: 14
  • Sorry its not a picture of me and QE2!
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #19 on: Feb 13, 2010, 09:41 AM »
Nice find indeed, is taking awhile to download but so far its thrown up some stunning videos

jdl

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #20 on: Feb 26, 2010, 04:23 PM »
Very sad news about Costa Europa

'A Costa Cruises ship crashed into a pier early today as it was docking at the Red Sea port of Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt, killing three crew members and injuring several passengers....'

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/cruises/item.aspx?type=blog&ak=80838.blog

Online cunardqueen

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #21 on: Feb 26, 2010, 08:53 PM »
One assumes that most of the passengers would have been in bed at this time otherwise it could have been a lot worse, Not that lm saying it isnt bad already. But had it been a few hours later when everyone was wide awake.

The lifeboats seem to have been readied for launching or was this caused by what appears a very large side impact
 Three deaths among the crew, l wonder where they were, might they have been invloved with the ropes etc at this time, Or perhaps in the cabins...
From the moment you first glimpsed the Queen,
 you just knew you were in for a very special time ahead.!

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #22 on: Feb 27, 2010, 12:05 AM »
One assumes that most of the passengers would have been in bed at this time otherwise it could have been a lot worse, Not that lm saying it isnt bad already. But had it been a few hours later when everyone was wide awake.

The lifeboats seem to have been readied for launching or was this caused by what appears a very large side impact
 Three deaths among the crew, l wonder where they were, might they have been invloved with the ropes etc at this time, Or perhaps in the cabins...

About the lifeboats - in any incident, wouldn't these be automatically made ready for launching - no matter whether they'd be necessary or not?

Do you think that her design could have contributed to the incident?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/8538505.stm

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Egypt-Three-Sailors-Killed-And-Three-Britons-Hurt-After-Cruise-Liner-Smash-In-Sharm-El-Sheikh/Article/201002415560357?lpos=World_News_News_Your_Way_Region_8&lid=NewsYourWay_ARTICLE_15560357_Egypt%3A_Three_Sailors_Killed_And_Three_Britons_Hurt_After_Cruise_Liner_Smash_In_Sharm_El_Sheikh

« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2010, 12:11 AM by Twynkle »

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #23 on: Feb 27, 2010, 12:13 AM »
Quote
About the lifeboats - in any incident, wouldn't these be automatically made ready for launching - no matter whether they'd be necessary or not?

No, Rosie

Offline Jem

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #24 on: Feb 27, 2010, 12:23 AM »

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #25 on: Feb 27, 2010, 08:34 AM »
'....Officials said that strong winds pushed the 54,763-tonne ship Costa Europa into a pier as it tried to dock at the resort. A 2m gash opened in its hull, allowing water to flood into a cabin and trapping the crewmen: an Indian, a Honduran and a Brazilian....'

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article7043301.ece

I wonder whether the use of bow thrusters in certain conditions can make manouvering in tight 'corners' more difficult, as opposed to the use of tugs?

(Mods, there's more on the new Costa Europa Topic!)
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2010, 12:55 PM by Twynkle »

Offline highlander0108

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #26 on: Feb 27, 2010, 01:18 PM »
What a horrible incident.  With all the rash of Carnival owned ships recently hitting, bumping, and crashing into piers, one has to wonder if there is a bit of complacency or over confidence in the ability of these newer ships to manouver in ports with the bow and stern thrusters.  Another Costa ship, the Concordia, recently got caught up in a squall in port and got blown into the pier too, sustaining a gash to the bow.  You can see the wind in the water kick up in this video and also the churning water and black smoke as it appears they went to full power to try to avoid the pier.  Scary thing is at the stern was a small tanker!

 Not a valid youtube URL
Remember all the times that Captain McNaught skipped a port due to high winds while in command of QE2 even when he was at the helm of QV?  I do think incidents like this show his caution was justified.  Perhaps not having the ability to manouver with thrusters and relying on lots of tugs does have its benefits.  I am sure that there were some docks "kissed" or nudged in QE2's service life though.
"There will never be another one like her" QE2's last Master Ian McNaught
My Blog:  http://qe2-prideoftheclyde.blogspot.com/

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #27 on: Feb 27, 2010, 01:27 PM »
Quote
Remember all the times that Captain McNaught skipped a port due to high winds while in command of QE2 even when he was at the helm of QV?  I do think incidents like this show his caution was justified.  Perhaps not having the ability to manouver with thrusters and relying on lots of tugs does have its benefits.  I am sure that there were some docks "kissed" or nudged in QE2's service life though.

The QE2 did skip lots of port due to bad weather it is in the end the best decision.Safety comes first, ALWAYS!!!

And yes the QE2 did "kiss" a few piers.New York was very famous for it.

Louis

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #28 on: Feb 27, 2010, 07:56 PM »
The Pacific is on watch for the tsunami that's already affecting the coast of Chile,
following the earthquake this morning (8.8 on the Richter scale)
Hope the ships and boat people will be OK.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8540621.stm

QE2 anchored off Easter Island in February 2 years ago on her final World Cruise.
Together with Hawaii, the Easter Islanders are waiting for the tsunami tonight.
http://vodpod.com/watch/2270121-qe2-world-cruise-2008-rapa-nui-easter-island
(from Cunardqueens)
« Last Edit: Feb 27, 2010, 08:08 PM by Twynkle »

Pat Curry

  • Guest
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #29 on: Feb 28, 2010, 08:50 PM »

Remember all the times that Captain McNaught skipped a port due to high winds while in command of QE2 even when he was at the helm of QV?  I do think incidents like this show his caution was justified.  Perhaps not having the ability to manouver with thrusters and relying on lots of tugs does have its benefits.  I am sure that there were some docks "kissed" or nudged in QE2's service life though.

On the 2006 World cruise, I think it was,  he became known by pax and crew as 'no-ports-mcnaught  because he had skipped quite a few ports.  The ship was supposed to overnight in Dubai but he held the ship off for 24 hours because of high winds.  Something like 500 pax were due to fly out on day 1 and 500 or so due to embark.  Imagine the chaos, re organising the new flights and finding hotels.  They bussed many up the motorway to neighbouring Sharjahi because of lack of beds in Dubai.  We were with entertainers in a modest Dubai hotel, 2 or 3 star, in the old town where they don't put pax, but it was really good (suoper curries) and no pressure (it even had spare rooms).

PS.  Captain Perkins was know by crew as Polly Perkins. 

Does anyone else know any other  Captains' nicknames?

Offline Mauretania1907

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #30 on: Mar 02, 2010, 07:38 AM »
Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostrom (master of Carpathia and Mauretania, among other ships) was known by his crews as The Electric Spark. Captain William Turner was known as Bowler Bill, because he wore a bowler hat when not on the bridge.

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #31 on: Mar 03, 2010, 08:30 PM »
On SKY News

'Killer 26ft Wave Smashes Into Cruise Liner'
'Two cruise-ship passengers have been killed after a 26ft wave smashed into the ship off the coast of France.'

'Nearly 2,000 people were on board the ship
A Greek coast guard statement says another six people suffered minor injuries on board the Cypriot-owned Louis Majesty.
It says the accident occurred near the French Mediterranean port of Marseilles, as the ship was sailing from Barcelona to Genoa in Italy with 1,350 passengers and 580 crew.
The victims have been identified only as a German and an Italian man...'

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Cruise-Liner-Hit-By-26ft-High-Wave-Killing-Two-And-Injuring-Six-Passengers-Off-Coast-Of-France/Article/201003115566656?

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 12241
  • Total likes: 15596
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #32 on: Mar 03, 2010, 08:37 PM »
Wow!

However, should a 26 foot wave be 'killer' ?  ...

Although its not a huge ship, a fair bit smaller than QE2 I think.

« Last Edit: Mar 03, 2010, 09:07 PM by Rob Lightbody »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #33 on: Mar 03, 2010, 09:37 PM »
Rob - she was lengthened by 33.76m in 1999
'The lengthening of the Norwegian Majesty however was more technically complicated than those of the other ships, as she had not been designed for such an operation.[4]'
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_Majesty
with a draft of just over 20 ft...

Another report - Associated Press
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gzhc8h8Y1HQaxCe6JsuyHrMA2G6gD9E7DLP80


I wonder about how a wave(s) is/are measured as accurately as to the nearest foot - specially with a sea running and in big swells?  One for the technical guys, maybe!



« Last Edit: Mar 03, 2010, 10:17 PM by Twynkle »

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #34 on: Mar 04, 2010, 07:45 AM »
Louis Majesty has arrived in Barcelona.


Louis
« Last Edit: Mar 04, 2010, 08:05 AM by Blue Bombay »

Online Peter Mugridge

  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3583
  • Total likes: 3406
  • At Mach 2 three days after being on QE2...
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #35 on: Mar 04, 2010, 05:23 PM »
The BBC has got hold of footage of the actual impact from inside:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/8550025.stm
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 12241
  • Total likes: 15596
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #36 on: Mar 04, 2010, 06:10 PM »
The BBC has got hold of footage of the actual impact from inside:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/8550025.stm

Yikes!  Just watched it 3 times... the bit at the start where the water comes in is pretty scary, but the people don't really look panicked or anything... if i'd been there i think i'd have been sprinting stern-wards rather than standing around righting upturned chairs as one guy does.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/cruise-passengers-tell-of-terror-after-two-killed-in-giant-wave-1916055.html?action=Popup&ino=2

The windows that have come in are in a very odd position, never seen windows there before in any other ship.... if i was them, i'd plate them over before anyone else gets killed.
« Last Edit: Mar 04, 2010, 06:19 PM by Rob Lightbody »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 12241
  • Total likes: 15596
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #37 on: Mar 04, 2010, 06:57 PM »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #38 on: Mar 04, 2010, 08:36 PM »
Do you think the windows were on deck 5?
And what about the possibly posh-er cabins on 6....
Aren't both decks still fairly high for an 8 metre wave?
http://www.louiscruises.com/decks_pdf/LM_deckplan.pdf

(So now 'it' makes sense...
The reason for many 'dividers' between panoramic windows in the Commodore Club (lounge - qV)
And these are high up above, and well aft of the bridge!)

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #39 on: Mar 04, 2010, 10:01 PM »

The clean of the damaged windows


Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #40 on: Mar 05, 2010, 01:05 PM »
There is a post on Liners List suggesting that the Louis Majesty was designed to be a ferry  :(

About giant waves
http://edition.cnn.com/2010/TECH/science/03/05/giant.waves/

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #41 on: Mar 05, 2010, 03:02 PM »
Quote
There is a post on Liners List suggesting that the Louis Majesty was designed to be a ferry 


True Rosie read here

http://www.simplonpc.co.uk/RoyalMajesty.html#anchor27760

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #42 on: Mar 05, 2010, 03:58 PM »
Good find, Louis.
Those windows look incredibly vulnerable.
With all the tight regulations, isn't it surprising that she was 'allowed' to sail
(with those glass windows) anywhere other than in sheltered coastal waters?

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #43 on: Mar 05, 2010, 05:20 PM »

Dozens of ships freed from Baltic Sea ice

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8550687.stm

Louis

Offline Twynkle

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #44 on: Mar 05, 2010, 05:39 PM »
Interesting to note the level of those windows in the BBC video, too!

Offline Jem

Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #45 on: Mar 06, 2010, 07:51 AM »
The clean of the damaged windows


To have those windows so close to the bow is mad! Who on earth passed her fit for sea? The frames look far to flimsy.

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Rough Seas and Mishaps
« Reply #46 on: Mar 06, 2010, 04:00 PM »

Here you can see the damage and the clean up

https://www.flickr.com/photos/photojordicom/4408889933/sizes/l/

Louis

Offline pete cain

Giant waves
« Reply #47 on: Feb 02, 2011, 09:05 PM »
I think you call it freeboard, am sure to be corrected if wrong, but here's the folly of building too far foreward & sending ships out to sea     http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/europe/03/03/cruise.ship.wave/index.html?hpt=T2http://, the one to look at is 'total chaos on cruise ship' (top lhs link) . This is a modern 'big' ship, 'bout 1m 24s in , shows it all..........
« Last Edit: Feb 02, 2011, 09:24 PM by pete cain »

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 12241
  • Total likes: 15596
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
Re: Giant waves
« Reply #48 on: Feb 02, 2011, 09:31 PM »
Rosie, as usual, had this hot off the press as it happened!  https://www.theqe2story.com/forum/index.php/topic,48.msg18441.html#msg18441
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #49 on: Feb 15, 2012, 01:29 PM »

Sailing round Cape Horn! The Mount Everest of the sailing world, they say...

Did I hear it right? Were they really doing 35 knots?
« Last Edit: Feb 15, 2023, 08:26 PM by Isabelle Prondzynski »

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #50 on: Feb 15, 2023, 09:45 AM »
Sad to read recent reports about Cyclone Gabrielle causing damage and loss of life in New Zealand.

A question for our ship's crew and those with knowledge of navigating - what evasive action can a ship's captain or navigator take to avoid a Cyclone? Is it just as easy as navigating a new route or are ships required to keep with a predetermined route?  Increasing speed to get out of the area seems like a good option, but is it as easy as just saying "full speed ahead"? The Chief Engineer would need to be involved in the decision, especially if the decision would use more fuel.
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Rod

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #51 on: Feb 15, 2023, 01:24 PM »
Lynda, it depends,depends,depends.
This kind of thing, depending on the urgency would normally come up at the morning meeting. All departments are involved. ChEng not so much because of fuel but to batten down the hatches, secure any loose gear, plan maintenance accordingly. Hotel dept. do we have to change the menu? Get different food up from the stores, sandwich meat instead of roasts. put the vomit bags out by the elevators, get the sawdust up from the hold, tell the pantries to secure their gear. Tell the bars to secure their stuff.Theoretically it should always be secure,. But, sometimes things get overlooked. Warn them they might get loads of room service calls. Doctors , so they can load up the syringes and make room in the safe for all that extra money. Deck Dept. make sure deck chairs etc are secure, boats are secure, all of their stores are secure. Secure pianos in the public rooms.
Can you avoid the storm, depends. How fast is it moving? If you alter course will you be moving int something worse like ice bergs? Or even land? Will changing your course do you any good. One trip Doug Ridley altered course about 6 or 7 times, but, so did the hurricane. That was in 72 or 73 I believe. 3 or 4 grand pianos damaged , a few , broken legs and other injuries, 4 or 5 windows on Upper and Quarter deck popped out. About $150,000 worth of crockery broken. Stem of the ship moved backwards about an inch when we fell off a wave!
So many things come into it.

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #52 on: Feb 15, 2023, 03:51 PM »
Thanks Rod for sharing your thoughts and experience of action taken when the ship is facing storm conditions
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Online Thomas Hypher

  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 2862
  • Total likes: 5531
  • QE2 started a dream to go to sea - now a reality!
Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #53 on: Feb 16, 2023, 04:11 PM »
Sad to read recent reports about Cyclone Gabrielle causing damage and loss of life in New Zealand.

A question for our ship's crew and those with knowledge of navigating - what evasive action can a ship's captain or navigator take to avoid a Cyclone? Is it just as easy as navigating a new route or are ships required to keep with a predetermined route?  Increasing speed to get out of the area seems like a good option, but is it as easy as just saying "full speed ahead"? The Chief Engineer would need to be involved in the decision, especially if the decision would use more fuel.

We try to avoid heading into or being anywhere near a Tropical Revolving Storm (a TRS - the type of storm that Hurricanes, Typhoons, and Cyclones are) in the first place (prevention being the best cure so to speak) but if we are caught up right in the middle or just in front of one, the bridge team will try to place and keep the ship in the navigable semicircle of the TRS and definitely out of the dangerous quadrant - to do with the increased severity of the wind and swells in that dangerous quadrant as well as the typical path of a TRS which changes depending on whether you're in the Northern or Southern hemisphere.

The goal is to stay hove to but with steerage to keep the wind in the right place on the ship's bow in the TRS's rear area (behind the dangerous quadrant) for any ship (even QE2) to allow the TRS to move ahead and track away.
The other goal if previously in the path of the TRS or otherwise being caught in it in the dangerous quadrant without being able to overtake it such as on a slow oil tanker is to get into the navigable semicircle of the TRS if possible as the winds will drive the ship out of the path of the TRS in the navigable semicircle as opposed to into the path of the TRS in the dangerous quadrant.
I suspect QE2 was in Hurricane Luis's rear area when she was hit by the 90+ foot waves in September 1995 given she was hove to according to accounts but still making way enough for steerage into the prevailing conditions with the wind on her starboard bow otherwise even she could've been in trouble given the severe conditions.

Overtaking the storm from within, if that's even possible given the severe conditions is definitely not what to do as far as we've been taught. One also has to keep an eye on whether the wind is backing or veering as the ship's bow has to be placed according to either regardless of location in the TRS and dependent on whether it's a Northern or Southern hemisphere TRS.

If caught in a TRS we'd be on hand steering with the ABs taking turns on the helm matching with the OoWs navigational watchkeeping schedule and we wouldn't be using the autopilot given it could be overwhelmed by the particularly severe conditions depending on it's settings and operating parameters/limits and could lose control of the ship's steerage with other consequences when it then attempts to get the ship back on course with a series of major helm inputs, such as stalling the main engine on an oil tanker or ripping the rudder off it's stock given the forces involved on a fully deflected rudder given maximum practicable speed is required within the different quadrants and semicircles of the TRS apart from being hove to in the rear quadrant area of the TRS. The human touch, feel for the ship, and experience being better and safer in this situation.
Maximum practicable speed being influenced by the severe conditions (the TRS will be working against the ship a lot), main engine operating parameters (avoiding overheating and overspeed etc), and whether the ship's bow is up to the amount of pounding (slamming) at a given speed in the severe conditions given it's the end of the ship that'll be taking the brunt of the TRS.

Increasing speed to overtake a TRS bearing down on your position would've likely been possible on a ship as fast as QE2 given the TRS's ground track speed isn't usually that fast, and the metrological signs of an approaching TRS are quite identifiable, quite apart from the detailed weather forecasting that is available as long as it's up-to-date to avoid the case of SS El Faro.

Alternative routes to avoid the TRS will be suggested within the bridge team and taken if necessary. The passage plan will be altered and the monitored route (the path the ship is navigated along) will then be updated on the ECDIS (Electronic Chart Display Information System) these days. Commercial pressures take a back seat to TRSs as ships are lost otherwise along with their whole crews as successfully abandoning ship and surviving the elements doesn't usually pan out very well in a TRS.
In normal circumstances the monitored route on an ECDIS can be tweaked quite often for many reasons such as a bunkering port not being confirmed out of several options until a couple of days before the end of crossing an ocean.

We wouldn't make port in any area likely to be affected significantly by the TRS, but we would seek the shelter islands can offer while hove to if reachable and appropriate.

If we encounter or suspect a TRS (or any storm above Beaufort Force 10 - including low pressures) that doesn't already have warnings out for it from other ships in the vicinity or from the likes of NOAA or the Met Office we are required by SOLAS to report it in detail, also being required to keep giving updates on it while remaining in it's vicinity.
« Last Edit: Feb 16, 2023, 04:24 PM by Thomas Hypher »
First sailed on QE2 in August 2003 aged 6 years old. Last sailed on QE2 in July 2008. Last saw the seagoing QE2 in person from the decks of QM2, on QE2's last Transatlantic crossing (Eastbound tandem) in October 2008. Visited QE2 in her new life, in Dubai, in January 2020 and August 2022.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #54 on: Feb 17, 2023, 08:26 AM »
Thank you, Rod and Thomas, for this fascinating (and vital!) information. These are times when the ship and her crew are severely tested, and all have to play their part together.

I can add that the hotel crew also have their role to play. My mother does not get seasick, so she wandered to the restaurant for her breakfast. But her legs were not strong, and she was struggling with the motion of the ship.

Seeing this, the MaƮtre d' rushed to her side and offered his arm to guide her safely to her table... where I was absent that morning. Kindness is a much appreciated quality, even in times of stormy seas.

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #55 on: Feb 17, 2023, 10:01 AM »
Thank-you Thomas for your very detailed explanation, which helped me understand a little about the decisions that are taken when the Bridge team are faced with a TRS.  Interesting to learn that different decisions would be taken for Northern or Southern Hemisphere TRS.

I found this web page with an explanation of the effects of Tropical Cyclones on ships.  There are a couple of diagrams that helped me understand your explanation of the dangerous semi-circle and the navigable semi-circle. 

https://www.stormgeo.com/products/s-suite/s-routing/articles/the-effects-of-tropical-cyclones-on-shipping/
 
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Mauretania1907

Re: Ships in stormy seas
« Reply #56 on: Apr 11, 2023, 05:26 AM »
People in the West Coast settlements just out of Auckland are still recovering from Cyclone Gabrielle. The settlements of Piha, Kerikeri are still off-limits to non-residents. Yesterday I went to Huia, which is just inside the Manakau Harbour and I noticed several repaired slips on my way there, covered with plastic so that more rocks and dirt don't fall on to the road.
If anyone wants to see what storms are 'available'  :o in the southern seas, read some books about the round the world non-stop yacht races, such as the Vendee Globe, the Whitbread races, also others which go through the Southern Ocean around the Cape of Good Hope, Cape leiwen and the Horn. Almost anybody who sails around the Horn in a yacht will have a story to tell! Even sailing around the South Island (of New Zealand) especially in winter, will give a rocky ride with perhaps a knockdown or if especially unlucky, a pitchpoling.

 

Favourite Liners and Ships

Started by Adam HodsonBoard Sea Shanties

Replies: 56
Views: 17261
Last post Jul 07, 2020, 04:32 PM
by Anubhav Mitra
The Beirut explosion and the ships affected by it

Started by Isabelle ProndzynskiBoard Sea Shanties

Replies: 1
Views: 491
Last post Aug 07, 2020, 10:42 PM
by Isabelle Prondzynski
Tall ships weekend - roll call

Started by Rob LightbodyBoard Past Events

Replies: 21
Views: 8388
Last post Jul 08, 2011, 07:40 AM
by Lynda Bradford
Ships in Kotor

Started by Bruce NichollsBoard Sea Shanties

Replies: 23
Views: 8939
Last post Apr 10, 2018, 05:37 PM
by Bruce Nicholls
Have ships managed to get their own crews back?

Started by Rob LightbodyBoard Sea Shanties

Replies: 6
Views: 564
Last post Jun 15, 2022, 03:33 AM
by skilly56