Author Topic: Where the world's ships go to die  (Read 3574 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

bobso

  • Guest
Where the world's ships go to die
« on: May 27, 2012, 07:12 AM »
Link here to a video showing where the World's ships go to die---


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-18182706



Offline highlander0108

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2012, 03:41 AM »
Thanks for posting this Bob.  You could change the name of the area to Alang and the scene is the same.  Here's another report from CBS's 60 Minutes along the same lines.

http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=3228443n
"There will never be another one like her" QE2's last Master Ian McNaught
My Blog:  http://qe2-prideoftheclyde.blogspot.com/

Offline Rob Lightbody

  • Administrator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 8010
  • Total likes: 3251
  • Helping to Keep The Legend Alive
    • Rob Lightbody dot com
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #2 on: Oct 21, 2012, 11:59 AM »
Interesting piece here

The ‘curse’ within the world’s largest shipyard | World News Blog http://blogs.channel4.com/world-news-blog/inside-the-worlds-largest-scrap-yard/23057
Passionate about QE2 for over 30 years.

Offline cunardqueen

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #3 on: Oct 21, 2012, 04:29 PM »
And given how health and safety and the lack of any decent safety clothing that exists then they can do it for rock bottom rates. The photo displayed is the first time iv seen anyone with hard hats in anything to do with Indian ship breaking...
Its when they cut the tip from the bow to release the spirit that l find distressing on ANY ship...
From the moment you first glimpsed the Queen,
 you just knew you were in for a very special time ahead.!

Offline Rod

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #4 on: Oct 21, 2012, 04:50 PM »
While I do appreciate the postings.....extremely reluctant to view the videos, makes me sad for days....even If I never sailed on the ship. I think of the people, probably dead now, that built her, the people that sailed on her......sorry...it's just me!

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #5 on: Dec 13, 2012, 11:09 PM »
Interesting article here about the livelihoods made in India from selling the valuable inventory off the ships, including kitchen equipment, televisions, ropes, etc :

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-12-01/news/35529067_1_ship-breakers-bargain-hunters-alangsosiya

Offline Mauretania1907

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #6 on: Feb 11, 2013, 07:24 AM »
Pete Knego of Maritime Matters has been to Alang to seek furniture and pieces of art from older pax ships. His blogs are always interesting.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #7 on: Sep 23, 2015, 10:59 AM »
Today I was able to get access to the Lloyds List Daily Briefing (usually only accessible on a fee paying basis).

Very interesting article here :

http://www.lloydslist.com/ll/daily-briefing/?issueDate=2015-09-23&expandId=468957&CTR=DBART2015-09-23

Towards the end, there is an interesting section on "green recycling" which I appreciated.

I also wonder whether the current decline of ship scrapping prices might just have an influence on the fate of QE2...?

Offline Lynda Bradford

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #8 on: Sep 23, 2015, 11:50 AM »
Certainly is an interesting article, particularly the EU legislation for recycling EU flagged ships. 
I am proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Clydebuilt1971

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #9 on: Sep 23, 2015, 01:04 PM »

I also wonder whether the current decline of ship scrapping prices might just have an influence on the fate of QE2...?

I would imagine so as it may cost almost as much to get a vessel to the breakers than its worth in scrap at the current moment in time therefore it is not viable for breakers to purchase it in the first place.

Gav

Offline June Ingram

  • Global Moderator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Total likes: 1686
  • Beautiful, elegant QE2 - forever Queen of the Seas
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #10 on: Sep 23, 2015, 02:39 PM »
Very interesting article.  Thanks, Isabelle, for posting the link. 
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline Peter Mugridge

  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 2507
  • Total likes: 769
  • At Mach 2 three days after being on QE2...
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #11 on: Sep 23, 2015, 09:49 PM »
I would imagine so as it may cost almost as much to get a vessel to the breakers than its worth in scrap at the current moment in time therefore it is not viable for breakers to purchase it in the first place.

The downside of that is that it could simply lead to a return to breaking in yards, particularly yards with large dry dock facilities...  :(
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Offline June Ingram

  • Global Moderator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Total likes: 1686
  • Beautiful, elegant QE2 - forever Queen of the Seas
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #12 on: Sep 23, 2015, 10:00 PM »
You are right, Peter, but if a ship has to go to the breakers, there is something less disrespectful (at least to me) to be taken apart in a yard than on the beach at Alang or in the Orient.   :(
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline Jeff Taylor

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #13 on: Sep 23, 2015, 10:48 PM »
My concern about QE2 is all that lovely aluminum in her superstructure, which is worth several times the value of an equivalent tonnage of steel, but pardon me for even bringing that up!

Offline Clydebuilt1971

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #14 on: Sep 24, 2015, 11:49 AM »
The downside of that is that it could simply lead to a return to breaking in yards, particularly yards with large dry dock facilities...  :(

Maybe so - I wonder what level of toxic materials reside within QE2? That could preclude the likes of Dubai Drydocks undertaking the works themselves.

Gav

Offline June Ingram

  • Global Moderator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Total likes: 1686
  • Beautiful, elegant QE2 - forever Queen of the Seas
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #15 on: Sep 24, 2015, 01:28 PM »
Certainly true about both the aluminum and the toxic materials.

Just think of Alang where a ship is just beached and then pulled apart with no apparent regard for the workers doing the pulling apart.

The concept of the "green" yards in China is good but does put them at a disadvantage to just beaching a ship.

QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline Peter Mugridge

  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 2507
  • Total likes: 769
  • At Mach 2 three days after being on QE2...
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #16 on: Sep 24, 2015, 10:06 PM »
That, at least, then puts it back under the "unviable" banner as we'd be back to the cost of the tow cancelling out any return on the metals.
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Online Twynkle

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #17 on: Sep 25, 2015, 12:34 AM »
Where the world's ships are taken to die
Here's the topic containing Mark Knopfler's 'So Far From The Clyde'
Having searched on YouTube tonight, it looks as if the great video may not exist now
https://www.theqe2story.com/forum/index.php/topic,1746.msg19347.html#msg19347

and more on scrapping
https://www.theqe2story.com/forum/index.php/topic,1713.msg55997.html#msg55997
QE2 has been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 9 whole years... she seriously needs to be earning her keep....

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #18 on: Jul 26, 2016, 12:40 AM »
Excellent article about Alang here :

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/india-news-india/a-graveyard-goes-silent/

It seems that business has declined significantly there, and many jobs are already gone or threatened.

Offline June Ingram

  • Global Moderator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Total likes: 1686
  • Beautiful, elegant QE2 - forever Queen of the Seas
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #19 on: Jul 26, 2016, 02:00 PM »
Thank you, Isabelle, for your post and link to this article.  It is an excellent article.  It is probably just me, but sending a ship off to Alang or some such place is so barbaric compared to sending a ship back to her builders for dismantling.  But most ships now and for some time could not go back to their builders as most of the shipyards are no longer in existence.  And how many workers at Alang and other places have been killed or maimed not to mention being exposed to all sorts of pollutants and carcinogens and have or will suffer long term effects. 
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #20 on: Jul 26, 2016, 02:19 PM »
Maybe I see it differently, June. I like the fact that so many of the dying ships' materials, equipment and furnishings can be recycled and re-used and that there is very little waste. Indeed, Peter Knego has managed to furnish many a home with (often beautiful) items bought from these ships.

I also like the fact that these beaches, gruesome though they are for us who love the ships, provide a lot of employment for people who would not otherwise have jobs, indeed who have travelled far because they could not find jobs in their home areas. Yes, they are risking their health -- but could they not be helped towards better working conditions by means of more stringent requirements on the part of those who sell the ships? And in any case, what is the alternative for the workers? No work at all, and no income for them, their families and their children...

I see a lot of sadness in this article.

What I do not see is a reason for the decline in the business. Is it going elsewhere? Are the ships being kept in service longer? Are they perhaps out of service but waiting for a renewed future (like QE2)? Or are there simply fewer ships about? Have they all been scrapped already during the crisis years?

Offline June Ingram

  • Global Moderator
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 5075
  • Total likes: 1686
  • Beautiful, elegant QE2 - forever Queen of the Seas
Re: Where the world's ships go to die
« Reply #21 on: Jul 26, 2016, 02:43 PM »
Hi Isabelle -

Thanks for your post.  Your points are very well taken.  But in "the olden days", when ships went back to their shipyards or other shipyards, known as going to "the breakers", sometimes whole interiors were saved, a good example being parts of Olympic.  So things were saved and recycled too, perhaps not to the extent as they are today.  Today, it is easier to get the word out about what is available due to almost instantaneous communications. 

I am not sure I agree with a job with risks is better than no job.  It appears that it should, but my grandfather worked in a brass foundry as a molder for years with no employee consideration.  He supplied a good living for his family.  But upon retirement, when he should have been able to enjoy the gardening and tree grafting, he was ill, and it was from the contaminants in the brass foundry.

Living in a town very close to General Dynamic/Electric Boat and having close ties to someone from Newport News Shipbuilding, mesothelioma has taken a tremendous toll on workers exposed to asbestos.  At first, the risks were not known.  Even after they became known, big business would lobby to continue in unsafe worker conditions in order not to increase their own costs.

I agree totally that more stringent requirements would be needed to help protect workers but they are slow to come.  And then what will protect the workers will most assuredly force most employers out of business due to higher costs.  It is surely a Catch 22 situation.

I have no answer; I just hope fervently that our beloved QE2 does not find herself beached in Alang and subjected to the humiliation and indignities that Alang and other places impose upon ships.

Rant over.  Thanks for reading.   :(
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline Greg Rudd

Where ships go to die
« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2017, 10:41 PM »
Indeed, Alang has claimed yet another Liner, I guess they thought they hadn't destroyed enough beautiful ships already... Norway and Saga Ruby both ousted by the cruise industry, hopefully Ruby puts up a fight during scrapping as Canberra did!

If the Canberra was scrapped in Taiwan(if they were still in that business) or China it would have been a easier task as they scrap dockside.

Online Oceanic

Re: Where ships go to die
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2017, 05:21 PM »
If the Canberra was scrapped in Taiwan(if they were still in that business) or China it would have been a easier task as they scrap dockside.
Indeed, unfortunately (and quite amusingly for us ship lovers!) Alang noticed their mistake too late, Canberra really did fight scrapping, it really did show the resilience and durability of ocean liners. 
"Some Profound Text Goes Here"

Offline Greg Rudd

Re: Where ships go to die
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2017, 02:19 AM »
Indeed, unfortunately (and quite amusingly for us ship lovers!) Alang noticed their mistake too late, Canberra really did fight scrapping, it really did show the resilience and durability of ocean liners.

This gives you an idea on how the Taiwanese used to do things. Ironically the Taiwanese left "that" industry overnight in 1988 due to a major industrial accident and new regulations that forced tankers to be "fully cleaned" before delivery for scrapping.

http://global-mariner.com/index114WhenShipsDie.html

http://www.joc.com/maritime-news/taiwan-ship-scrapping-firms-are-heading-scrap-heap_19880926.html