Author Topic: QE2's Radio Room  (Read 28103 times)

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Online Twynkle

QE2's Radio Room
« on: Feb 19, 2012, 10:48 PM »
The Radio Room

Please is anyone able to tell us more about it?
Was it the hub of all QE2 communications?
Before it was 'de-commissioned', how many people workerd in there
and were the Watch times the same as elsewhere?
It must have been a fascinating place!

QE2 Radio room topic on Shipsnostalgia forum

Photo of QE2 Radio Room from MrReilly website

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The Queen Elizabeth 2, Qe2, Radio Room With Operator, Medium Shot
« Last Edit: Jun 26, 2020, 03:59 PM by Rob Lightbody »
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.

Offline Louis De Sousa

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #1 on: Feb 20, 2012, 07:17 AM »

Offline Louis De Sousa

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #2 on: Feb 20, 2012, 07:30 AM »
When QE2 entered service the plan was that 9 staff would operate the Radio Room around the clock, this never happened.Until 1987 the room was only operated by 6 staff.After the big refit and with new equipment that numer was reduced to 3.

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #3 on: Apr 20, 2012, 12:01 AM »
Remember that at the out set of QE2, dont forget that I am older than our Lords donkey! The radio room had to do all the communication for both the ship and the pax. Satellite when QE2 was launched was for military use only and was horrendosly expensive.
Telegrams were still in use...remember them? The ship had to order spare parts, arrange repairs etc telephone calls were around 7 pounds/minute. Telegrams were still sent in morse at times.
Orders for food, technical stores and deck stores were put on punch tape and sent that way as it was faster. sometimes the tape would be over 200 feet long.
When satellite calls became available as general they were still expensive....so you had to wait for Portishead radio to have a circuit available...sometimes 3 hours...then find the person was not at home!
I remember when the first public cell phones were put up on A stair at the Boat deck...long lines at a million bucks/minute! When I left it was hang on let me call NY!

Online Twynkle

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #4 on: Dec 17, 2012, 06:40 PM »
Calling both Engine Guys as well a Deck Guys - and just wondering...again!!
Did you use the radio 'stuff' between the bridge and ECR, because it would be interesting to know where the receivers were situated in the ECR?
Only asking because the noise downstairs must have been deafening without ear muffs, yet it must have been impossible to hear anything with them on.....
Many thanks - and hope it's not too stupid a question...
Rosie
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #5 on: Dec 17, 2012, 09:50 PM »
Rosie, your questions are never stupid.

Comms between Main control room and bridge were by phone and intercom...same as Turbine control room and bridge. Between the various engine spaces there was the intercom system. There was also a direct line phone between bridge and MCR and TCR. Post "big refit" of course the TCR went. But same comms between bridge and what became the ECR (MCR).
Deck Officers had very expensive walkie talkies for docking and emergencies. Engine Dept eventually got cheaper ones that were ok on deck but because of the steel they did not have enough power to penetrate and be much use below decks.
There was a pager system that was quite effective. During emergencies the "Tannoy" (PA) system was used to a great extent.
One of the cruise staff, at his own expense, bought a unit that allowed him to "Carry" his cabin phone with him...but again because of the metal...not very effective.
Regarding ear muffs......believe it or not...they were not used until the late 70's!!!!! What did you say? You will have to speak up Rosie!!!! But with them on you could still hear Tannoys as they only deafened certain frequencies.

Offline BlueSparky

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #6 on: Mar 08, 2014, 08:35 AM »
Hi all, I suppose this is the best thread to carry on my QE2 memories, seeing as I spent the majority of my time on board in the radio room!!

I joined the old girl on 6th October 1988.  On being shown my cabin on the boat deck which I shared with my oppo, stowing my bags, I was taken down to the radio room to meet the boss Allan Holmes, a big gruff man from Blackburn.

He welcomed me and showed me the main stuff in the radio room.  As a bright eyed, fresh out of radio college lad, I was struck by the relative age of the equipment and the Heath Robinson approach to installation!  I later come to learn that was the way it was done by Radio and Electronic services!

My first introduction to the magnitude of notoriety that the old girl commanded was literally a few hours away. I was anxious for us to cast off for our trip to the Mediterreanean, which we did with the usual band of Royal Marines serenading us on our way.  After being underway for a short time there was an almighty shuddering from the ship.  Not knowing what it was I just thought it was normal, until the telephone rang.  I anwered it to be greeted by BBC Radio Solent asking why the QE2 had nearly ran in to the Isle of Wight.... I said that I didn't know what was happening but I would put them in touch with someone who may know and promptly put them in touch with the bridge.
I turned out that the ship was only about 150 yeards from the shore and the new diesel engines had worked beautifully.  First lesson - the QE2 was always in the news!

I have lots of other memories that I will recount over time.  I wonder if anyone else was on board at that time and can remember this?

Online cunardqueen

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #7 on: Mar 08, 2014, 06:56 PM »
Welcome aboard BlueSparky

I was a passenger on this my third QE2 cruise. It was the start of a great cruise, but l wonder how many passengers were aware of just how close it was, under the command of Captain Bennell.

 The first l knew of it was reading the front page in my cabin the next day.Certainly it was very windy, l have a photo of a bird (the feathered kind) on the deck.
Such was my excitement l asked the radio room to fax the cover to my parents in Orkney, l had given the wrong number and it had to be resent, cant recall how much it cost, but to me sending a fax over the ocean was very hi tec. Along with making a phone call, which then was very expensive, but very clear

Then again after the refit the previous year with direct dial phones it must have made the workload easier?
The stars onboard if you remember were Vince Hill, Claire Reynor, Frankie Howerd, Lional Blair,Bobby Crush,Mr Saville  :-X
Were you ever allowed to attend the cocktail parties? was morse code still being used ? Im sure it would be interesting to hear more of your day to day routine for what for some of us was a service that we used but knew simply nothing about.
 
From the moment you first glimpsed the Queen,
 you just knew you were in for a very special time ahead.!

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #8 on: Mar 09, 2014, 07:52 AM »
Hi, thanks for the information.

I remember Mr Saville very clearly, used to chat to him on many occasions, both on the telephone when I was connecting his telephone calls to the many occasions he used to say hi to me as he did his daily jog around the decks to waving and calling my name when ashore, much to the bemusement of my crew mates!

I spoke to Claire Rayner on a few occasions, as I did with Lionel Blair, but the best was when I had my photo taken with Frankie Howerd when he visited the radio room... Always loved the tv show "up Pompeii" so it was a great thrill for me to meet him.

I never did attend the cocktail parties as I wasn't classed as an officer, even though I was fully qualified, a very sad part of my short time on the ship.  But that is another issue.

Morse was on Its way out as a means of communicating with Telex and satellite as well as radio telephone being much more prevalent. However it was still broadcast as identification and we still kept watch on 500 kilohertz for distress traffic.

I have one lasting memento of my time as Morse was a favourite means of communicating (I still practise morse as I am a radio ham) - I have one of the QE2 morse keys that the chief radio officer gave to me!

As for direct dial calls from the cabins, that wasn't the case. Passengers had to call the radio room staff to connect their calls either via RT or satellite phone. We used a Siemens Nixdorf exchange for this operation.

There were 2 separate satellite systems as well as the extensive radio fit out.

I have some pictures somewhere that I will try and find and I'll put them on when I get chance.

...-.- de GBTT


Offline June Ingram

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #9 on: Mar 10, 2014, 03:44 PM »
Thank you very much to all for your very interesting commentaries.  Can you please tell us more about the type of equipment in the radio room ?  Thanks !  June
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Online cunardqueen

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #10 on: Apr 11, 2014, 10:45 PM »
Bluesparky..
Remember this, the insert from the onboard QE2 newspaper..

and a stowaway....poor thing.
From the moment you first glimpsed the Queen,
 you just knew you were in for a very special time ahead.!

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #11 on: Jun 07, 2014, 06:28 AM »
Hi I am Roger Latham who was 2nd RO 1968/1969.  I am moving a query to Willum here as I think more appropriate place than the introduction page.

Willum
Radio Room Photos
Have you any more photos of the radio room in the earlier days.  Rather strangely despite the huge number of photos of the ship, there are very few of the radio room.  I found a couple in the IMR Sponsor brochure - but I am not sure if they were mock up photos and may have been changed in the final fitout.  There does not seem to be a website for the old IMR.  From memory IMR were not that happy with the final radio installation in 1968 - I think there was too much interference as to equipment fitout.
Not related to IMR but an example was the installation of Lincompex on the radphone circuits. It did not work well due to interference on the control channel at times.  Was it still in use during your time ?
I have a few photographs from around early 80s when QE2 was in Hobart but equipment had changed then.

Main Transmitter
I have a query re the ITT 1kw main transmitter - not the ST1430 self tuning transmitters.  Was the main transmitter an  ST1400 or was it the later ST1600 which was a self tuning transmitter with remote control.  I was at IMR in Croydon 4 to 8 November 1968 doing a course on what I put in my diary as ST1400.  I have a publicity photo of the 3 QE2 ROs ( not Don Butterworth) looking into the main transmitter. From memory I think this was actually an ST1200 but the ST1400 was to be installed on the QE2 - as the ST1400 is not remote controlled or self tuning, IMR installed servo motors on the controls.  That was my memory of it and years ago I put this on another forum.  This memory was disputed and said that only the reserve transmitter had been modified with servos for remote control.

The question is who is correct - you would probably know the answer.  I am sure there was 4 off 1kW transmitters available that means the IMR ST1400 had remote control servos fitted or that IMR installed the ST1600 with its remote control self tuning.

The IMR ST1400 (or ST1600) was  the only type approved main transmitter on the QE2 at that time as the ST1430s were Swedish Army transmitters. To comply with regulations the ST1400 ( or ST1600) would have to be controllable from the radio receiver room.

HF Notch Antenna
I have another query in relation to the HF "notch" antennas mounted on the funnel. ( For the non technical readers, these are the white large boxes low on the funnel casing in early photos)  We were told they worked on the "notch" principle - like a bolt-on slot antenna.  I did not understand this at the time  - there was too much else to think about then.  QE2 was not supposed to have wire transmit antennas and was to rely on the "notch" antennas. However wire transmit antennas were installed even before the trials.  The "notch" antennas had a very narrow bandwidth and were hard to tune - manually of course !

I have recently been looking into how these "notch" antennas worked.  Rather strangely I can find almost no information on the web. They must have a patent for them but I cannot find it.  I now believe they are not "notch" antennas but rather "coupled loop antennas" .  Coupled loop antennas started to be of interest around 1965 judging by the patents - therefore that would fit. There seems to a revival of interest in this technology - using a funnel or mast as a radiator on warships.

Query - Did you ever look into how these "notch" antennas work ?

VHF Notch Antenna on Bridge
Another oddity.  Why was a VHF "notch" aerial mounted in the centre top of the wheelhouse ?  It spoilt  the lines of the ship.  I think it was Alan Holmes who said it looked like a tram destination board and he was right ! Yet, unlike the HF "notch" antennas it seemed to stay on the ship for the whole of its sea life !   Was it really a VHF Marine antenna or was there something more to this than meets the eye ? I find it hard to understand why this was left when in its place could be a normal almost invisible VHF whip antenna with no loss of performance !

Query - did you ever find to which equipment it was connected ?

I will attach a few tiny bits of photos showing the "notch" antennas on the QE2 for the benefit or those not familiar.
I am having trouble attaching multiple photos so not sure how many are attached !


All the best

Roger







 

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #12 on: Jun 07, 2014, 06:53 AM »
Willum
I was right I was not able to attach multiple images.  I will try again. This time I will post without doing a preview first

Roger

Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #13 on: Jun 07, 2014, 11:12 AM »
Hello Roger, 
The Lincompex was confined to the bin where it belonged by the time I joined in 1977 as was piccolo. The 3 x ST1430's were for HF only they weren't actually type-approved for marine use.

The main Tx (Tx4) was an Ericsson EB1500 MF and HF permanently connected to the Main Aerial (Long wire) the Emergency TX was an EB400 with a remote control unit made by Jim Neary.
A second EB1500 was installed (TX2) and the control unit can be seen behind Brian in that photo.

So we had 5 1kW+ transmitters, No1, 3 and 5 were ST1430 with No5 dedicated to Sitor, and 2 x EB1500's.
The EB1500's were remote controlled and type approved. Only the MF CW EB400 was on battery back-up.

The Notch aerial above the bridge front was actually an HF receiving notch not VHF. There were 2 VHF notches further up the signal mast by the whistle, one for the Bridge VHF and the other for the Radio Room VHF, these worked ok as they didn't need tuning.
HF Notches are still used on aircraft but these were hopeless on QE2 as the internal tuning mechanism soon jammed and they were impossible to service, so HF Wires were soon installed around the funnel and the Main aerial going aft to the back of the helicopter deck on the port side. 

At the same time a number of receiving wires and whips were installed around the signal mast, each operating position had the facility to select any of 6 receiving aerials, one of which was the notch but it was useless.

I too do talks for Radio Clubs (G3YPQ N.Cornwall)  and have a few pic of the R/Room and bridge, but they are all slides, so good luck with your events.

Willum (and there's more where that came from, Jim!)

Photo information from Willum :

Quote
Willum seated and Standing L-R Brian Martin, Ian Hamilton, Allan Holmes and Peter Hughes.
« Last Edit: Jun 29, 2020, 09:17 AM by Lynda Bradford »
Willum

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #14 on: Jun 07, 2014, 01:05 PM »
Willum
I was right I was not able to attach multiple images.  I will try again. This time I will post without doing a preview first

Roger

Roger,

I am loving your contributions, so I am keen to make it as easy as possible for you!  You can attach up to 8 images to one posting.  It "should" be easy, and you should also be able to preview.  You can modify the original post and add more images to it too. 

Instructions here (method 1) -

Information & Welcome » Welcome, Guidance, Forum News » Instructions » How to include Pictures with your forum message
 
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Offline Roger Latham

Radio Room
« Reply #15 on: Jun 07, 2014, 03:48 PM »
Willum

Many thanks for your explanation. It does clarify much confusion.

I looked up the Ericsson EB1500 transmitter on the website ul http://www.seefunknetz.de/eb1500.htm.  It implies that the transmitter was not on the market until 1970 - obviously after the QE2 came into service. It was built by the Norwegian company
Elektrisk  but sold by German company Ericsson.

I am now sure my memory was correct that the ST1400 was installed with remote controlled servos - which were awful to use and clearly the reason for the change to the Ericcson EB1500 prior to your arrival in 1977.

The HF notches were also awful to use and as I said wire aerials had been erected prior to the trials. There were four - two each side from a point each side of the funnel.  We found problems with interaction between transmitters.  The problem with the St1430 is that once tuned it would not perform a retune if there was interaction with another transmitter tuning.  It would just lower the power.

Did you ever look up how the notch antennas were supposed to work ?

I cannot remember what was the reserve transmitter during my time - it was probably IMR but IMR re-badged many equipments.
I wonder if Jim Neary used the redundant servos from the main transmitter after it was changed ? 

My memory totally failed me as regards the notch above the bridge.  I thought it was VHF so I was obviously confusing it with the VHF notches up the mast.  Why did they leave the receive notch there if it did not work very well ? It was very unsightly.I  Presume it could have been moved further aft and would still work. Probably moving it would upset the compensation of the standard magnetic compass.

As I recall the Lincompex units as originally used  had the compression/expander sub channel control outside the audio passband.  Due to ITU regulations, as installed for QE2 it had to be put inside the marine audio passband with restriction of audio range. Any other station transmitting on the same frequency would mess up the control channel with their audio ! Result was it rarely got the improvement it was supposed despite a huge publicity hype at the time. Also I do not think we could use privacy/ speech inversion at the same time.

Interesting that the Piccolo was gone before you arrived.  In general the Piccolo worked better than the Plessey ARQ. The problem was if there was interference then Plessey would not even get of the ground asking for repeats !  Whilst the Piccolo would continue even if there was a few errors.  I do not remember much about the Plessey ARQ - I presume it was an early form of Sitor.  Was  Plessey still working after 1977 or had you changed to Sitor ?  Piccolo and Plessey made a punched tape for the Addresograph-Multigraph Printer.  From memory it punched up on a Siemens M100 looking teleprinter - at least the Piccolo did.  How many unit code tape did the machine use ?  It would have to be at least 7 unit but I suspect more because it had to handle different fonts and font sizes. The adverts and photos were of course put on board  before sailing.
I have in front of me now the actual Daily Telegraphs printed on April 3 1969 - one of the first successful. Headline was "LEFT REVOLT AS WILSON TELLS OF FAILED MISSION "Also for May 10 and May 27 1969.

In 1969 we used Creed 444 teleprinters and it looks as if they were still in use around your time.  Once again my memory fails me as to what was the the modulator and demodulator used for the RTTY signal ?  Since then I have used different types in Antarctica such as Frederick.  Were they US Northern Radio 152/153 units ?

Out of interest were you on QE2 in February 1985 ? I visited QE2 on 17 February 1985 in Hobart and was very impressed with the ITT STR910 frequency agile transmitter/receiver which had just been installed.

In August I will have held an amateur licence for 50 years continually.  I started as G3SHG in 1964 when still at Bristol College getting my Certificate of Proficiency.  Then VK6RY ( a good RTTY callsign) and have been VK7ER for 37 years !

I presume you are from Cornwall.  My wife is born in Plymouth but family originally came  from Newlyn. I normally go to England each year for 2 month around this time always starting in Cornwall !  In fact I should have been there now but had to cancel my flight at the last minute !

Strangely I took very few photos of QE2.  Like you many of my other ship photos are on slides. For this talk I have converted some by the crude way of using a plastic diffuser/ light assembly from an old scanner and a cardboard tube around the lens of the camera against the slide.  Result not perfect but acceptable. Some slides do seem to lose colour after 40 years and often appear washed out.

Anyhow, once again many thanks for the information - I am trying to get the story straight for my talk ! Its a pity there is not a website with detailed information about the radio equipment on QE2 over the years.
All the best

Roger

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #16 on: Jun 07, 2014, 04:22 PM »
Hi Rob

I am pleased you like my posts.

Thanks for the instructions about attaching multiple photos.  I read them and it seemed to be the way I was trying to send them.

I have now found the problem.  It was due to the setting on my firewall.  I use Outpost Pro 9.1 with web control set pretty tight to block Active X, Visual basic etc.  I did previously try running the firewall in "Allow Most" but there was no change.  I had to put in an exclude for www.theque2story.com and that fixed the problem.  You can sometimes be too secure with a firewall ! I should have thought of that sooner.
http://theqe2story.com/forum/Smileys/default/embarrassed.gif

Once again many thanks for your help Rob.

Roger

Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #17 on: Jun 07, 2014, 07:53 PM »
Hello Roger,

You're right about pretty much everything, Sitor became the mainstay, 5-unit code (ITA2?) and there was punched tape everywhere! we used miles of it, and it was easy to get mixed up, Ciaran once sent the OBS to the Dorchester Hotel. The telex machines were Creed 444 with an ASR33 on the Std-A Satcom. The newspaper came in by Sitor, and you could direct dial remote telex machines without GKE intervening. The mod - demod was the Marconi Spector, one of the best things ever to come out of Chelmsford apart from the roads.

 Yes Jim used the servos from that TX for his EB400 remote variometer tuner and you could also change crystals and power level. I rebuilt the Radio Room side as it eventually started becoming unreliable.
No I never investigated the notches, we always said the Bridge top RX Notch would be removed for us one day by an enthusiastic N.Atlantic but it hung on!

Yes I was in Hobart in Feb 85, Tech R/O, my now-wife Sarah was on board and took photos. I was a Plympton lad myself! Did 1st class, Radar, and MED at Plymouth Poly. There's quite a bit about QE2 Radio room on www.shipsnostalgia.com especially about the joys of passing the Radio Survey, - usually my responsibility for my sins. Those Marconi Salvare lifeboat radio installations in the crash boats were, to be polite, challenging, but amusing to think we couldn't get a Passenger Cert without 6 x 807's working.!

Perhaps this is getting a bit too nerdy for the forum, feel free to PM me for more geekdom.

Willum

Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #18 on: Jun 07, 2014, 08:08 PM »
Perhaps this is getting a bit too nerdy for the forum, feel free to PM me for more geekdom.

Not a bit, Willum, quite the opposite! Although there is no way I can join in this learned debate, I am looking on with fascination and once again enjoying all the knowledge that comes to this Forum.

Keep going, both of you, and anyone else, do join in!

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #19 on: Jun 07, 2014, 08:19 PM »
Please continue the nerdy talk in public! Even though i don't understand most of it, it's all googleable for future people researching this stuff... Bring it on!
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Offline Adam Hodson

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #20 on: Jun 07, 2014, 11:46 PM »
Please continue the nerdy talk in public! Even though i don't understand most of it, it's all googleable for future people researching this stuff... Bring it on!

I'll second that!
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Online Twynkle

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #21 on: Jun 07, 2014, 11:52 PM »
Please continue the nerdy talk in public! Even though i don't understand most of it, it's all googleable for future people researching this stuff... Bring it on!

Yes! Agree with Rob, and very much  LIKE etc - this nerdy speak is brilliant! Can't get enough of it!
And please, guys - when you have finished the bit about yards of tape and rebuilding, and hand-overs etc, can you say how many clever techie R/Os and crew there were on board at anyone time? Just thinking about what would have happened should you have been unwell, unable to work. If there was only one of you, then did the deckies or engineers or anyone else know how to send and receive messages / telegrammes/ other info?
Thank you, both.
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.

Offline Hank Hargrove

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #22 on: Jun 08, 2014, 01:31 AM »
Agreed.


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Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #23 on: Jun 08, 2014, 10:49 AM »
QE2 - as in many other respects - was a little different. The R/O's were all employed by a Cunard subsidiary called Radio & Electronic Services based in the Cunard Building in Liverpool. This company prided itself on being much more technically orientated and other shipping lines who generally employed Radio Operators and when things went wrong a local agency came on board to fix things. In my day QE2 had 5 R/Os, Chief on day-work, 3 watchkeepers and a daywork Tech R/O. No PO's or crew. We were expected to do our own repairs on board, the Technical R/O - could also be a watchkeeper and help out when the amount of phone and telex traffic got overwhelming. I took over the tech job from Alan Burbidge and I learnt a lot from Brian Martin so the leave rota had to have either Brian or me on board at any one time, sometimes both, in which case we took it in turns to do a watch. We would talk over technical problems with the other R/O's, but essentially the Tech R/O was a one man band, in my case literally. R&ES developed Marinet a marine  email system that was adopted by a number of shipping companies. I had a small workshop called 'the potting shed' Boat Deck A-Stairway just alongside the R/Room. Once the main Radar Scanner motor burnt out and with help from the Engineers we made up a plate and fitted a motor that was a spare for one of the Galley Dishwashers, it went round a bit fast (and initially backwards) but it got the 10cms Radar back working. The tech R/O was the all purpose problem solver from autoclave to autopilot, it was a great job. A crew member once brought me a dead Ghetto-blaster, on opening I found, by a slot near the battery compartment, that 4 wires had been neatly cut though with a pair of scissors, I repaired them and returned it, but not before putting an extra resistor in each channel to limit the volume.

Offline Alan Snelson

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #24 on: Jun 08, 2014, 12:48 PM »
Yes it is great to read about all the stuff that was going on that only a handful of people knew about, it gives even more depth to the forum.

I remember your little 'potting shed' and visited it a few times, once with a television set I purchased in Singapore which would not work on the PAL system, thankfully it came with a circuit diagram so Willum was able to sort it out in no time. The tech R/O was also called upon on a couple of occasions when we had electronic failures on some of our darkroom equipment, namely Durst HS75 printers. Of course we carried spare circuit boards but diagnosing faults was beyond any of the photography departments abilities so it was a good job you guys were there otherwise we would have literally been out of business.

When we were going to be away from Southampton for any length of time, usually the winter cruising season, the Chief Photographer was required to send details of all our business activity on board at the end of each week. This consisted of passenger numbers, photos taken, pax on board, photos sold etc. this was all handled by the radio room who I think sent a Telex message back to our head office in Southampton.

Do you remember another R/O called Fred Tordoff? He was an amateur artist and I still have a painting he gave me back in about 1981.
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Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #25 on: Jun 08, 2014, 03:14 PM »
Hello Alan, Yes I sailed with R/O Fred Tordoff on QE2 and he was a very good painter, in fact I just 'googled' him and he's all over the place, his paintings, many maritime, seem to be in demand so you might have an investment there!  Living in N.J. now by the looks of it.

Willum

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #26 on: Jun 08, 2014, 04:08 PM »
Willum

Thanks for the information.  Its looks as if the readers prefer us to discuss technical queries here rather than PM !

I do have a few queries but I will have to write them tomorrow ( actually today as it is now after midnight !).

It seems there is an interest in things QE2 Radio.  I wonder if Rob could eventually set up permanent page or two with the specification of the equipment in the radio room over the years. Perhaps even having a diagram of the consoles and the equipment in each. There is so little out there on the web about the radio room and transmitter room.  Details of the special setups from the early days such as Piccolo and Plessey will be lost as will the original heathrobinson modified ST1400 transmitter etc.

Just think there was no photographs of the Titantic radio room ( I know one of the passengers took a photo before Ireland but not much detail) and when it came to make the movie they had to copy Olympics radio room instead !

I know that amateurs and others do look for photos and details of the Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth radio rooms and are available.

There is little available for the QE2 radio room and transmitter room.  Sometimes  in the future the collective memories of the old ROs will vanish as they go QRT ! Forums such as this may be the only source of information unless Cunard makes public some of its archives - if they still exist.


All the best

Roger

« Last Edit: Jun 28, 2020, 10:46 AM by Lynda Bradford »

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #27 on: Jun 08, 2014, 05:24 PM »
You've probably seen it but if you go to www.pond5.com and put QE2 Radio there are 3 brief video clips of Allan Holmes, Jim Barlow and Peter Hughes in action, and one of the telephone exchange gals. Actually Pond5.com has heaps of QE2 clips.
« Last Edit: Jun 08, 2014, 05:32 PM by Willum »
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Offline CAP

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #28 on: Jun 08, 2014, 08:37 PM »
The R/O's were all employed by a Cunard subsidiary called Radio & Electronic Services based in the Cunard Building in Liverpool.

I have this one page flyer on file for Cunard's Radio & Electronic Services, however, I can't add anything more about the picture shown

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #29 on: Jun 09, 2014, 12:33 AM »
Hello 'CAP' not seen that photo before, its Peter Hughes posing with the 1st Satcom machine we had fitted in 1976. An Inmarsat Standard -A made by Scientific Atlanta. Calls were USD10 per minute, the Radio Room had to call up Goonhilly or Southbury Connecticut, then either dial the number or ask an operator ashore to dial, then the box on top of the set had a button to patch it through to the telephone exchange. Its telephone number was 00 871 1440301. It could handle phone and telex - but was hopeless at Fax as it was a 4-wire system. A very good piece of kit in its day. It was connected to the single 'mushroom' dome in the middle above the penthouses that contained a 1m diameter dish that had to be pointing at the satellite at all times so it was gyro-stabilised with compensation for pitch and roll. I remember demonstrating it to Buzz Aldrin.
Willum

Offline CAP

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #30 on: Jun 09, 2014, 09:24 AM »
Willum, many thanks for the explanation of the picture.  I did have suspicions of there being a QE2 link.  The flyer formed part of a much larger brochure pack issued by Cunard for all of its services at the time.  I am led to believe the brochure is circa 1982.

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #31 on: Jun 09, 2014, 05:30 PM »
Willum

Here is my query for you.  I would be very very pleased if you could identify the equipment in the consoles on the attached photos.

The 1969 photos and identification came from the QE2 IMR sponsor brochure.
The labels are from the photos but put against each unit in the rack.
My memory is not so good on these units,  in particular I am not sure about the IMR/ITT transmitter exciter and the model number.
I am not sure if the original units were synthesizers.  The units shown as exciters do not look right.  They still look the same in the 1985 photos.

What did the Transmitter band and channel unit do ?  Was it the device that simply showed on the wall panel as to which transmitter was operating on which band and frequency ?

The 1985 ? photos are part of a number I took when the ship was in Hobart.  The ship came into Hobart in 1977 and 1985.  I cannot remember if I went aboard in 1977 and took any photos then.  I am fairly sure these photos were taken in 1985 because the ITT SRT910 is shown in the corner and as I understand was installed sometime around late 1984.

The 1985 console receivers look like SKANTI  R5001, Debeg 7204 or  SAIT MR 14501 . 
I assume the GEC receivers had been removed, as were the ITT main receivers which are shown in the other IMR photo .  The GEC would not have been type approved and the IMR receivers were probably originally included for compliance.  Again I assume as the new receivers were type approved the old IMR ones could be removed.

I had a look at the videos you mentioned but of course cannot be posted as they have to be purchased.  I could not find relevant photos.  There is still a lack of radio room photos.  I could post mine from 1985 if no others around.  As I took them there is no copyright problems.

Once again thanks for your help Willum

Roger
« Last Edit: Jun 10, 2014, 05:09 AM by Roger Latham »

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #32 on: Jun 09, 2014, 11:41 PM »
Phew, takes deep breath. Ah yes, I remember eet well. Thanks for the photos proper takes I back.

Pic1
L-R   1) Thats the EB400 remote control panel that I made to replace the original by Jim Neary that had become flaky. 2) STR65 VHF. 3)Ericsson EM100 exciter for TX2, dial the freq up on nixie tubes. 4) EB1500 remote control TX2 manual tuning. 5) Rx Aerial selector panel 6)Rx2 Skanti R5001 7) Freq Synth for TX1 fitted in about 1981 as the ST1430's were originally crystal only.

Pic2
Receivers Skanti R5001 might have been badged as SAIT.
Upper unit is EM100 exciter for Main Tx TX4. lower is TX4 EB1500 remote control unit.

Pic 3
The ghastly IMR SR401 deaf as a post and drifted all over the place. There was another in the IMR rack in the Tx Room. On the wall is the Redifon Auto Alarm receiver. Not required as we were H24 of course.

Pic4 Box on the left is the headphones / key patch panel, hardly used. By the text 'what is this unit' is actually the lower third of the GEC receiver - the handles show the size, it was a big rx.
The distribution unit switched the AF to the TX or the Telephone exchange, it also switched on 'Condition A' a so-called secure HF SSB but all it did was to switch to Lower Sideband! never used. You could also switch on the WOO caller a modified record player with a cutout GBTT wheel and microswitch that sent an audio CW tone on SSB to summon Ocean Gate Radio. Try that with Portishead and see how far you get!

There was a centre console with the Main receiver a Redifon R408 tuned to 500khz. You could unplug it and lug it up to the TX room where a set of jones plugs allowed you to use it with the EB400 in the event of the cables from the RR to the Tx room being damaged.  Also another dreaded SR401 tuned to 2182khz mercifully with a crystal osc! 
Finally 2 x eddystone EC958 receivers one tuned to the BBC World Service and the other to VOA that fed audio to  the SRE room on 3 deck for the pax cabins.

And those I miss, I hope you'll pardon..

Willum
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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #33 on: Jun 09, 2014, 11:55 PM »
Forgot this bit

"What did the Transmitter band and channel unit do ?  Was it the device that simply showed on the wall panel as to which transmitter was operating on which band and frequency ?"

There was a band/channel control on each bay patch panel that had a tell-tale supposed to allow the chief or any other op to see what freq you were on without asking! never used. Also the aerial selector units had a passive pre-selector. the 2 knobs on the right, useful if you were suffering any intermod from the sitor or something but generally you could have 3 channels on say, 8Mhz without QRM. Thats the difference between pro and ham gear, with pro gear you can have a kilowatt a few khz and a hundred yards away without wiping out your receiver.
Willum

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #34 on: Jun 10, 2014, 05:07 AM »
Willum

Many thanks for the answers to my questions on the control panels.

Know I know the names of the equipment I will create new diagrams showing the names of units in 1969 and 1985  based on my own photos.  With the lack of 1969 photos I will try and recreate the 1969 versions of the consoles from my 1985 photos - if that makes sense.

I will remove the photos from the post but will post my photos ( without my  queries on them )  and new diagrams later .

I assume there was not a lot of changes in the radio room equipment from 1985 until it was removed.  What happened to all the equipment did any of it go to a museum ?

Once again thanks for your help - I could not have sorted it out without it !

Roger

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #35 on: Jun 10, 2014, 07:33 AM »
Willum

I thought I had it all sorted but still having a problem with the model of the old transmitter exciter.

In 1985 the forward console and others the  exciters looks the same as in 1969. I presume that was the crystal controlled one mentioned .


It seems that the exciter in the console is original - as it looks the same as on IMR brochure.  It is certainly possible that IMR used a re-badged exciter.  It probably had ITT on it but I cannot remember the model number.  I suppose if it came with the ST1430 it could have been a normal exciter with that transmitter. I wonder what was the original exciter with the ST1400 that clearly got removed.  It must have been different because it would have had MF as well.


To help I have shown unit positions 1 to 7 on the diagram.  That should help you in any reply.

Sorry to bother you but I think you are the only person who seems able to answer my questions ! I think the diagram will be of help to others in future.

I still have to work on the diagrams for the other consoles but the more you do the easier it gets !

I was a bit confused in draft 1 of the diagram but I think I have now sorted that out and all should be right now. Can you please correct any errors.



All the best

Roger







Quote
« Last Edit: Jun 10, 2014, 10:36 AM by Roger Latham »

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #36 on: Jun 10, 2014, 09:25 AM »
Willum

Here is a photo taken November 1968 with Left to right. myself Roger Latham, David Wain, Instructor and Alan Holmes attending ST1400 course at IMR factory in Croydon.

It is possible the exciters on the QE2 were similar. Unfortunately you cannot see the front panel as the instructor is standing in the way.

If you go to this website

http://www.seefunknetz.de/st1400.htm

You see that the Debeg ST1400 Transmitter is almost the same . Equipment manufactured by Swedish Standard Telefon AB.
Whilst the website shows a frequency synthesizer version the lower part of the unit is almost the same as the QE2 Version and would fit in with the photo on the IMR course. The lower part is shown hanging down.

Note
The photo was given to us all on the course by IMR for publicity purposes.  I have no idea as to its copyright status as IMR no longer exists. If there is a  copyright owner and they wish it removed please advise and I will remove it.

Roger

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #37 on: Jun 10, 2014, 09:45 AM »
Hello Roger, You know people say you can remember things from years ago, but not what happen 2 weeks ago well its true!

(Cue Alan Freeman 'Pick of the pops' music......)
 
In at No1. is the Transmitter control unit, push buttons for on/off Standby and HT on and a RF light.

At No2 ST1430 frequency generator, Band (2,4,6,8,12,16,22) and Crystal (1 to 12) selector switches

At No3 ST1430 exciter control for A1, SSB, Tune, Drive level push button 'key' and the knob on the right test meter position.

At No4   Rx Antenna selector unit and passive RF preselector. This also had Nixie tubes, very extravagant as there was a tube for each switch so if you put on Rx AE4 then a tube with '4' lit up above the switch, as if you didn't know! The 2 knobs on the right are Band and Tune for the preselector and the right hand switch switches the preselector in or out.

The 2 knobs above the headphones patch panel are the Band/Channel for the tell-tale indicators that were never used.
Incidentally you'll notice one of the headphones selector buttons is black and all the others are white. This is the 'home' position and in this case its button 3 showing that this is bay 3. In the Aft console photo you can see its home position is 1.

Bay 3 eventually got a synthesiser as per bay1 but not when this photo was taken.


++++

As to what happened to the gear, well I left QE2 in 1988 after 10 years there, so the Radio Room was still in business though we had a second Std-A Inmarsat by then. The one memento I would have liked would have been one of the straight IMR morse keys. But I actually have a better memento - XYL! (for those casual readers thats Ham-speak for wife, YL is Young Lady and X is Ex)

Keep 'em coming Roger, or have I done it? and should this be my specialist subject on Mastermind?

Willum
Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #38 on: Jun 10, 2014, 09:53 AM »
Hello,

Ref the Debeg website, the middle photo shows the synth set to 2182, but the section underneath shows the exciter controls, a very similar panel to the ST1430 controls we had on QE2 but our freq gen was crystal controlled until the synths turned up.
Willum

Offline Roger Latham

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #39 on: Jun 10, 2014, 11:05 AM »
Hi Willum

We crossed our posts. I was posting draft 2 and corrections then found you had posted in the meantime !

Anyhow thanks - you have given me more information which I could add later to drawings.

Its the first time I have tried to produce drawings from a photo like this. It took a bit of experimenting to get the right look.  It  looks more like some of the pages in a handbook ! 

I did it by cutting part of the original image image. I had to correct some of the distortion due to perspective with Serif PhotoPlus X5. I then posted into an Excel spreadsheet. Then resized it.  Added the captions. Easier to do in spreadsheet than on an image.  Then selected the print area. 
I then saved as pdf with Cute Writer.  I then opened the PDF with PDF-Xchange Viewer ( free version) and then exported as jpg.

Saving via a PDF removed all the grid lines and cleans it up.

There you are. The only trouble is the time it takes to make a correction to the diagram.

Now I have to try the other consoles which have a greater distortion due to perspective !

Fine about wanting the morse key but getting an XYL - agree you had the best of the bargain !   As I say I wonder what did happen to the equipment or the thousands of radio equipments removed from ships when radio officers became redundant. I suspect scrapped but as an amateur it sounds an awful waste !


I put the drafts of the the other consoles here. Can  you please advise errors.  Thanks

I found an image on the web of the exciter of a Debeg ST1200 transmitter.  It looks identical to QE2 except it has an additional switch on the right.  Perhaps that was the MF frequency switch and probably what used with the ST1400 on QE2 originally.

I have had to find numbers for the consoles so I named them 1 to 5 from forward clockwise to aft. I know that is not their real number but its the only way to make sure we are talking the same units ! I am not sure how the transmitters are numbered. If you advise I can correct the diagrams.

I have had difficulty with the centre console which I called console 3.  I am unsure about the A1 A2 units but I thought one should SR401 but my photo has only the right 1/3 of units !

OK I think thats the lot for the consoles.  I await your reply on the centre console .


All the best

Roger




« Last Edit: Jun 10, 2014, 03:10 PM by Roger Latham »

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #40 on: Jun 14, 2014, 09:51 PM »
Question for both of you....
HOW did you become/decide to become RO's?

Did you see a movie?. Start out learning electronics and see and ad?
You ALL seem to have multiple skills! I remember borrowing Pete Hughes for the " Doodie Washer " on a number of occasions!

Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #41 on: Jun 16, 2014, 09:25 AM »
Hello Rod, In my case we had an old Bush valve radio at home with Short Wave on it. I used to listen to foreign broadcasts from places like Hilversum and Moscow. Then a neighbour who was an amateur radio op loaned us an R208 proper short wave receiver, and I used to spend hours listening to radio amateurs and early ship to shore. At 16 I enrolled on the evening class in the Radio Amateur Examination, which was tucked away on the next to last page of the Plymouth Polytechnic prospectus for 1968. Then thumbing through the rest of it found the course for Marine Radio Officers. I told my mum (who I think you met on QE2) that's for me. I was 2 weeks in to A-Levels, gave that up and started at the Poly which was a 1/2 hr bus ride from home. R/O's didn't have an apprenticeship scheme so it was 3 years later that I finished the education and had to go to sea! In those days the shipping companies used to tour the colleges looking for recruits (how things have changed) I went with BP. Got fed up with oil-bergs and then met Brian Martin almost by accident, and he suggested I join Cunard.
R/O's are a one-man band on ships and tend to be good at getting things working with creative solutions. Oh, and the other thing, its generally believed that Morse Code drives you eccentric, and that helps.

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #42 on: Jun 24, 2014, 05:33 PM »
Thanks for sharing your story with us Willum. Interesting how you went from BP to Cunard with the QE2.
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Online Lynda Bradford

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #43 on: Jun 18, 2020, 10:01 AM »
I have recently been posting copies of the pages in the 1969 Press Guide "The New Cunard Queen Elizabeth 2" which has sections on the ship's equipment and design to promote the ship.

Section 8: Radio Communications may be of interest to readers of this topic

The information on the radio communications equipment gives the view that it was revolutionary for the time. However, I have directed people reading the topics to also read the posts in this Radio Room topic, where there is far more information.

Roger Latham had suggested in a previous topic we should list the equipment that has been mentioned in this Radio Room topic.  I agree this would be a good idea.

The Ship of Many Parts topic lists supplier information at the time when QE2 was built.  I have added as much information as I can gleam from the 1969 document. 

To take forward Roger's idea I think we need someone who has an understanding of the Radio Room equipment, so as to ensure we record the information accurately and also to consider the timeframe.  For example, the equipment listed in the Press Release document, when was this replaced, by what equipment was it replaced and what equipment (if any) remained on the ship until her retirement? 

I look forward to your views and some discussion on how to take forward the task of listing the Radio Room equipment.
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Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #44 on: Jun 19, 2020, 01:18 PM »
I'm happy to contribute to this, I have some original photos and some from my tenure which was 1978 to 1988  as Technical R/O

As noted in a previous post:
Quote
Here is a photo taken November 1968 with Left to right. Roger Latham, David Wain, Instructor and Alan Holmes attending ST1400 course at IMR factory in Croydon.
« Last Edit: Jun 29, 2020, 10:06 AM by Lynda Bradford »
Willum

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #45 on: Jun 19, 2020, 02:23 PM »
That would be brilliant to have you involved, Willum as there is nothing better than first hand knowledge. 

Do you think a good starting point would be for you to look at the extract of information I posted in The ship of many parts to identify what was still used when you joined the ship in 1978?

This is the extract of the information on equipment from the New Cunard Queen Elizabeth 2 Press Guide produced for the ship's maiden voyage. 

An improved telephone service for passengers achieved by the use of ..

Notch Aerials - little black boxes developed by the British Aircraft Corporation for supersonic jets

The revolutionary Lincompex system designed by the GPO.  Research and engineered and produced by GEC

Automatic self-tuning transmitter developed by International Marine Radio Company


Remotely controlled transmitters

“For long distance communication there are three main transmitters of a type recently developed, specially designed to be remotely controlled from the wireless room, whilst for short distance radio telephone, ship to shore and ship to tug communication four VHF transmitter receivers are installed. “

Redifon manufactured main telegraph receivers and auto alarm unit

Muirhead picture transmitter installed for the transmission to the press and news agencies

International Marine Radio Company was responsible for the whole installation on QE2. They engineered and installed the system including the four simultaneous conversation and the two picture circuits

In the event of emergency adequate battery power transmitters installed aboard and in two of the lifeboats Marconi Salvare II is permanently fitted powered by nickel cadmium batteries supplied by Alkaline Batteries Limited. 

The Plessey PT 200 and the Diplomatic Wireless Service/ Marconi Piccolo systems were on trial to cater for the production of the Daily Telegraph on board. 




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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #46 on: Jun 19, 2020, 04:28 PM »
Hello Roger, 
The Lincompex was conf.....

I was just re-reading this interesting topic, and saw your photo attached to that post was very blue!  I've colour corrected it, and re-attached it here.

Quote from Willum:

Quote
Me seated (Actually receiving a telegram from Buck House at that very moment) Standing L-R Brian Martin, Ian Hamilton, Allan Holmes and Peter Hughes.
« Last Edit: Jun 22, 2020, 03:41 PM by Lynda Bradford »
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Offline Andy Holloway

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #47 on: Jun 19, 2020, 05:58 PM »
I was just re-reading this interesting topic, and saw your photo attached to that post was very blue!  I've colour corrected it, and re-attached it here.

Terry Foskett, is that you extreme right?

Online cunardqueen

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #48 on: Jun 19, 2020, 09:02 PM »
Is that Alan Holms 2nd in on the right ?.
From the moment you first glimpsed the Queen,
 you just knew you were in for a very special time ahead.!

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #49 on: Jun 20, 2020, 05:41 PM »
Willum seated, then  from right  to left Peter Hughes, Alan Holmes, Ian Holmes, Brian ?.

Offline Andy Holloway

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #50 on: Jun 20, 2020, 06:03 PM »
In the 1998 refit[?] The Radio Room ceased to exist in it's original form and became a rather beautiful, spacious with 3 separate rooms, a bedroom, a dining area and an entertaining area. I think i wrote about it in a post about John Cleese travelling from NY to S'ton where he was allocated it.


Offline Dave Lowing

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #51 on: Jun 20, 2020, 07:37 PM »
Rod, Is it Brian Martin?

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #52 on: Jun 20, 2020, 07:44 PM »
Brian Martin. Yes.

Offline Andy Holloway

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #53 on: Jun 20, 2020, 11:50 PM »
Brian Martin. Yes.

Ah yes, now I look closer yes it is. Served with Brian several times after he 'rebadbed' as a Computer Officer, both with Cunard and then Seabourn, he must be retired by now surely!
Didn't he live in Australia?

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #54 on: Jun 21, 2020, 10:52 AM »
In the 1998 refit[?] The Radio Room ceased to exist in it's original form and became a rather beautiful, spacious with 3 separate rooms, a bedroom, a dining area and an entertaining area. I think i wrote about it in a post about John Cleese travelling from NY to S'ton where he was allocated it.

Thanks Andy - it was the 1999 refit.  Michael Gallagher has posted about the Radio Room being converted into the Caledonia Suite in the 1999: Suites added Aquitania, Caledonia, Carinthia topic
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
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Offline Ed Derbyshire

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #55 on: Jun 21, 2020, 12:38 PM »
Hi all,
I am an ex Sparks (but not Cunard although I often saw QE2 doing transatlantics between Canada and Europe) but to add slightly to the topic I have this (see photo) bought from the US of all places. Have loved reading the topic and as an ex IMR man it reminded me of happy times at sea.

Offline Andy Holloway

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #56 on: Jun 21, 2020, 12:52 PM »
Ah yes, now I look closer yes it is. Served with Brian several times after he 'rebadbed' as a Computer Officer, both with Cunard and then Seabourn, he must be retired by now surely!
Didn't he live in Australia?

Brian also grew a very impressive, RAF type, moustache in later life.

Offline Willum

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Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #57 on: Jun 21, 2020, 10:47 PM »
They should have called it The Marconi Suite.  Small correction to the photo line up, yes me seated (Actually receiving a telegram from Buck House at that very moment) Standing L-R Brian Martin, Ian Hamilton, Allan Holmes and Peter Hughes.

Offline Rod

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #58 on: Jun 22, 2020, 03:35 PM »
mistyped, sorry.

Online Twynkle

Re: The Radio Room
« Reply #59 on: Jun 24, 2020, 02:35 PM »
This Topic never ceases to amaze me!
We had met a QE2 ex-Purser's Office person on board QE2 in 2008, who with his lovely wife invited us to a great party in the Caledonian Suite - Ex Radio Room.
From Day one of The QE2 Story Forum 2009 I had always wondered why not a great deal had "happened' (been written) about Radio Comms etc - and it took till 2012 to get it started...
Just to say - Thank you to all who have contributed - and  taught me so much!
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.

 

QE2s Captain Chair for sale...

Started by cunardqueenBoard Miscellaneous QE2

Replies: 1
Views: 705
Last post Sep 24, 2016, 10:45 PM
by Pete Hamill
Were QE2s propellers the most powerful in the world?

Started by Rob LightbodyBoard Technical Matters

Replies: 8
Views: 839
Last post Oct 13, 2018, 10:57 AM
by Rob Lightbody