Author Topic: Safety features on board QE2  (Read 21359 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #30 on: Feb 27, 2012, 10:49 PM »
For Rosie. Pax never got in the lifeboats because of the liability issue, as Rob said. After a massive failure of a break winch on No 11 boat while lowering it with the night workers...(they used to be able to get the first launch ashore used to set up the shore side end).  They only lowered boats with the 3 boats crew. When no 11 failed the whole boat was stranded with night workers and crew about 75 feet above the water! Took nearly 3 hours to get everybody out and the boat back to it home.
If housed properly, there were 2 wires strapped around the boats during the "house" period. These are called gripes. They wer leld tight by devices called senhouse slips, quick release..Knock off the senhouse slips..lift the break...that red handled thingy...boat would lower to boat deck wher it would be brought snugly into the side of the ship at boat deck by the bowsing in tackle. That too was held by senhouse slips. knock those off and lower to upper and quarter decks. Fill up and lower to the water...the hooks should realease automatically, and the boat is free to go. The hooks,,called blocks weighed close on 1/2 a ton and could ruin your whole day if they hit you. So they were usually guided out of the way.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #31 on: Feb 27, 2012, 11:00 PM »
Thank you for all those details, Rod! Fascinating...

Presumably the procedure was a bit different when lowering the lifeboats for tender service?

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #32 on: Feb 28, 2012, 01:20 AM »
Thank you for all those details, Rod! Fascinating...

Presumably the procedure was a bit different when lowering the lifeboats for tender service?

Not really Isabelle,
The gripes would be taken off and the boats lowered to boat deck. If it was the first launch port of a cruise it would be loaded with all the paraphanalia needed for shoreside and let down to the bottom. It was also needed to moor the landing stages to the ships side. Once all that was done, the shore party and nightgang would head for shore as soon as immigration had cleared the ship. While this was going on other launches would be lowered and made ready.

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #33 on: Feb 28, 2012, 06:14 AM »
Whatever training the crew do onboard passengers never take part in it.In some cases they even argue with the crew because an area will be out of bounds for an hour.

As for lowering the lifeboats only the crew in the Boat Preparation Party take part in it.On one occasion in Barcelona we did during training lower a lifeboat full of crew.I was to involved in another occasion training man overboard situation this happened in Barbados.

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #34 on: Feb 28, 2012, 09:11 AM »
Whatever training the crew do onboard passengers never take part in it.In some cases they even argue with the crew because an area will be out of bounds for an hour.

After the recent Concordia accident I can imagine passengers will be taking a different viewpoint on being inconvenienced when staff are taking part in safety drills.  I am more aware of safety drills onboard the new ships than I was onboard QE2 (I do not know why) but a friend had sleep disturbed, on several occasions onboard QE2, by crew using radios in the corridors.  This made me realise that even as passengers sleep the crew have training to do in relation to safety.  
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
www.qe2event.com

Offline Twynkle

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #35 on: Feb 28, 2012, 09:34 AM »
Thanks so much, Rod.
The whole process has always been intriguing - even lowering and raising the paint raft too!
How often did you need to check / inspect / do maintenance on the tenders as life-boats - expect this was necessary regularly and quite frequectly - parts of them would be subject to sea-spray damage too, I guess
I guess it was a great job - tending to the tenders!
I have a short video of each and every step that you describe from the boat deck of QE2 - sadly I'm unable to put it into YouTube (server restriction on 'Gigs' etc)

Not surprisingly, there have been many more opportunities to watch both the lowering and raising the life-boats including the new rapid response craft on the new Cunard ships too.  The routine is still exactly as you describe - Night crew off with the tent, tables and gangway ropes etc off at first light; sometimes they return with 'locals' as well.
(a tender on QV got stuck at a  diagonal angle during a practice drill - we were over-nighting in St Petersburg - the Russian authorities weren't 'able' to supply a crane to help shift it. We had to sail onwards to Estonia where the people in Tallin were more than willing to help out. A rumour went round the ship regarding safety etc - people anxiously asking 'Isn't it against the rules to sail with the tender stuck..? ;)   A team fronm the ship's builders in Italy also flew over to inspect, consult etc!
 (image to follow)

All the best - and thanks to for remembering and telling us so much in great detail
Rosie

Offline Bruce Nicholls

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #36 on: Feb 28, 2012, 10:22 AM »
After the recent Concordia accident I can imagine passengers will be taking a different viewpoint on being inconvenienced when staff are taking part in safety drills.

Somehow I doubt this, I am always amazed at how immune some people are to their own safety, especially if it inconveniences them personally.

Thanks to Rod for his clear description of how the bits we never get to play with all work.

Offline Louis De Sousa

  • QE2 Crew member
  • Queens Grill Diner
  • *****
  • Posts: 3837
  • Total likes: 3823
  • QE2 The Greatest Ship Ever
Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #37 on: Feb 28, 2012, 11:22 AM »
Some notes i took out about the launching and clearing the ship

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #38 on: Feb 29, 2012, 12:18 AM »
Somehow I doubt this, I am always amazed at how immune some people are to their own safety, especially if it inconveniences them personally.

Thanks to Rod for his clear description of how the bits we never get to play with all work.

LIKE!!!!
Not only the thanks Rod but the original comment.. Whatever the hell you do as a Cruise Director, NEVER, NEVER, NEVER have a bar open at least 2 hours before a boatdrill!
It would be nice if we did learn...the regulating authorities do, but if it inconveniences a pax???? fuggedit. Several times, in fact many times thinking about it I was asked by pax...do I have to go. After I went to a rescue of a cargo ship, with no pax, I just said...thats up to you. You will learn what to do in the event of an emergency. That greatly increases your chance of survival if we do have an emergency. If you do not go, that greatly increases your chances of dying in the event of an emergency. YOUR CHOICE!
One pax complained and I was hauled in front of the Staff Captain, Capt Ridley. What did you say etc etc...told him, his response was: "OH FOR CH%#@t's sake. You still drink gin?"
5  weeks later I was called to Ridleys cabin again....I just got a letter about you....uh oh... It was the from the pax saying he was wrong, he apologized to me, and to the Staff and said that he now  realized that it was a DEADLY serious business.
Ridleys reply?





"You still drink gin?"

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #39 on: Feb 29, 2012, 12:33 AM »
Now to Rosie
I have to print her questions out to make sure I answer them to the best of my " One year older than our Lords donkey" memory allows.
First of all. Yo do realise that there is an "Ask the Engineer " thread???????????
Kidding! I very much appreciate everybodys interest, especially those of you that still sail, (misnomer?) Anything that I can do to educate the public, that go to sea, as to what goes on behind the scenes. EVERY different department on board a ship likes to think that they are the key. But deep down, they realise that a ship is the PRIME example of a team, you lose one team member....the team is screwed. Example: Louis would think that as long as he kept on selling drinks and keeping the pax happy he was the most important member as he was making Cunard a profit. True....but if he couldn't put ice in that pax drink...he was screwed!

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #40 on: Feb 29, 2012, 12:59 AM »
OK now to Rosie.
Tender maintenance, even though they still had to be used as life boats was, before each launch port, twice/day during each launch port, and after the boat was housed. This was mechanical inspection. Lifeboat inspection was carried out once/month by the Boats Officer, usually a Second Officer( Deck Dept) who did that job as an extras to his watchkeeping duties. He would check the emergency stores, oars, YES ALL BOATS HAD OARS,  ALL BOATS had emergency kits, including food, water, medical supplies. flares etc etc. Oh and BTW...toilet paper was not on the list of emergency supplies! That was all the Boats Officer.
ALL aircooled boat engines were tested during boat drills. We tried to drop every boat at least once/month and give them a good run around. There was a boat mechanic that made sure that all oil, fuel etc level were good and if not at the next launch port we would take care of it.
Most of the damage to the tenders was taken care of by the ships carpenters, including hole in the hull etc.
About the tender stuck.
Depending where the ship is registered, if ANY form of life saving apparatus is not available, then the certifying athourity must be notified and a waiver given after time for repait etc is explained to them . For example, as I posted in another thread...when #11 winch blew up the ships approved pax carry was reduced.
There international regs that determine how many pax, not crew, must be able to be carried on ONE sides boats, used to be 80%. The whole ships life saving capacity must be able to carry...agai a certain percentage over...and it is big. But if you do not go to the drills and dont know where that overpercentage is...then good luck and I hope you can swim in 20 degree water!

Offline Twynkle

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #41 on: Mar 01, 2012, 06:12 PM »
Somehow I doubt this, I am always amazed at how immune some people are to their own safety, especially if it inconveniences them personally.

Thanks to Rod for his clear description of how the bits we never get to play with all work.

Big LIKE and thanks to Rod, too.

Hey Bruce - That's quite a thought!
I wonder whether there was ever an occasion when a passenger (a Doc perhaps, or ret'd mariner etc)
were ever called upon to give a 'helping hand'.

Really off topic, I know - however it'll be interesting to see whether apart from the inevitable question of insurance, qualifications etc,
anyone does know if pax were ever enlisted...and we could place this elsewhere
« Last Edit: Mar 01, 2012, 10:08 PM by Twynkle »

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #42 on: Mar 01, 2012, 11:31 PM »
To Twynkle and Bruce, sorry Bruce ladies first.
I know of 2 instances where the Docs enlisted the help of pax docs. For one they looked at the pax list first found 3 drs of Philosphy(SP?)a dentist, 2 teachers, and finally....what they were looking for...A VET!
The other occasion they sucessfully found an Oncologist.
To Bruce regarding your comment:
Especially if alcohol is involved. Alcohol fuels that mysterious gland alot of people have that produces that magic substance that says: " I AM INVINCIBLE....I JUST FORGOT MY CAPE!" And argumentative with it.

Offline Imonlygoingforone

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #43 on: Apr 20, 2012, 09:44 AM »
I do remember Pax being asked to help in an emergency on one occasion - to give blood. Crew were forbidden from giving blood, probably because of our significant amount of immunisations, however seeing some people in action in the Pig, I'm not sure that was the full reason...!!

Talking of lifeboats, during the drydock in 2004, all of the lifeboats were removed to a local boatyard, and the innards removed to the fibreglass hull. They were then completely refitted with new gunwales, seating - and then on the run throughout the year, the engines on all of the open boats were replaced. During the final layover in Southampton, 11 of the boats were taken to Hythe, where they had brand new hooks fitted at considerable expense, due to deterioration of the old ones. Lots of money was spent towards the end on those old tubs...

Offline Rod

Re: Safety features on board QE2
« Reply #44 on: May 08, 2012, 11:04 PM »
In my day, the hospital carried a blood donor list of crew members willing to donate. If the docs thought they would need it they would contact the people they needed and give them a time frame. I gave blood on 4 occasions as I am that common as muck stuff that almost anyone can take. Doc always recommended Guiness afterward.
Forget that hot sweet tea garbage!

 

Safety Control Room

Started by Michael GallagherBoard QE2 build photos

Replies: 24
Views: 9424
Last post May 11, 2010, 05:37 PM
by cunardqueen
QE2 Forward Bow Thruster Aperture & Door - Health & Safety?

Started by YoungesteverpassengerBoard Design, Concept & Build

Replies: 3
Views: 4649
Last post Apr 06, 2017, 12:11 PM
by Hugh Morrison
Cunard Safety Record

Started by Bob C.Board Cunard

Replies: 2
Views: 2003
Last post Jun 03, 2012, 04:15 PM
by Chris