Author Topic: Ability to swim  (Read 1153 times)

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Online Rob Lightbody

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Ability to swim
« on: Jan 31, 2012, 09:04 PM »
I can't swim, despite numerous attempts to learn.

I am deeply concerned now, after the Concordia tragedy, at the number of people who were able to save their lives, by being able to swim.  I would be far more nervous now, on any ship, even my beloved Waverley.

So - can you swim?  If you can't, do you think about it when on a ship?
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Offline Louis De Sousa

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Re: Ability to swim
« Reply #1 on: Jan 31, 2012, 09:07 PM »
I have no in problem in swiming.I learnt to swim in a river in which the water is heavier than sea water.Sure not everyone can swim and some passengers on ships dont know to swim.But the crew thats playing with life how can you work on a ship and not swim?It beats me truly.

Matteo 91

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Re: Ability to swim
« Reply #2 on: Jan 31, 2012, 09:26 PM »
I can swim without problems  :)

Wheter the ability to swim can really save your life in a similar event is a different question:
we must remember that the Costa Concordia sank a few meters from an island while the majority of these events happened in open sea ... and there are many problems in swimming in open sea  8) , such as the conditions of water (both temperature and height of waves), the effort itself, the proximity of land or lifeboats and the huge suction caused by a ship sinking.
You can also be the best swimmer in the world, but there would be no escape...  :-[

Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Ability to swim
« Reply #3 on: Jan 31, 2012, 10:42 PM »
Rob, if it is any comfort it was mentioned on a documentary a couple of years ago that, surprisingly, quite a high proportion of Royal Navy crew are not swimmers.

More seriously, you will find that you are naturally bouyant to some extent ( but do kick off your shoes should you find yourself in deep water ) and in salt water that is even more evident; staying afloat is probably the most important thing and in the event of a sinking there is likely to be a lot of floating debris around which could serve as a makeshift bouyany aid.

I am not a swimmer myself, but I had no hesitation in booking QE2 or in going on a ferry, for example.

These events are quite unusual and statistically it is unlikely to happen when you are on board.  Think how many voyages take place without incident every year.
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Online cunardqueen

Re: Ability to swim
« Reply #4 on: Feb 01, 2012, 08:40 PM »
Quote
   I can't swim, despite numerous attempts to learn.

I am deeply concerned now, after the Concordia tragedy, at the number of people who were able to save their lives, by being able to swim.  I would be far more nervous now, on any ship, even my beloved Waverley.

So - can you swim?  If you can't, do you think about it when on a ship? 

Coming from an island community and having links with the sea, l never could swim, a paddle in the sea was as far as l got,and that was where you learned to swim, in the sea ! & that was mighty cold, the sand got everywhere...... non of this swimming pool lark and heated water
 Years ago, my ex had the brainwave of giving me swimming lessons, l had a rather hapless go at swimming with some sort of plastic floatation device, looked more like a tray to me, and ended up at the bottom of the pool having near swallowed half of it. it was the same month as we had made the wills out, (surely he wasn't that keen to get my QE2 collection...)
Upto chest level lm fine after that l get v e r y  jittery. l can handle a Jacuzzi, just, and they are quite enjoyable if truth be told, but that's as far as l go. As for a revisit to a swimming pool, not even with the ear plugs, goggles, nose clips and swimming hat thing, besides what would they make of a 40 something man in such a state.

Its always something lv been aware of on any ship is that l cant swim, and more so when latterly on QE2 they actually told you how to jump off into the water, lm thinking but there's enough life boats etc for everyone and heaps more so what are they trying to tell us, then during a quick question l was the only one in the small group who couldn't swim.

But then commonsense kicks in,you would never be in the position of requiring to swim if such an event as a ship sinking below you ever happened.  But yes Rob its something lm always aware of is that l cannot swim.
 
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Offline Rod

Re: Ability to swim
« Reply #5 on: Feb 01, 2012, 11:56 PM »
I do not know the %'s of people that can swim or cant...No matter. If you don your life jacket correctly, on a ship over 50 tons I think it is, an air liner etc then the jacket will keep you afloat for a very long time...I mean months! AND right side up! that is why the high collar is on the jacket and all the bulk is in the front. So if you hit your head and are knocked out while evacuating...if you end up in the water...your head will be out of it! Then the idea is to move yourself by kicking or doggy paddling away from the ship to the nearest boat or raft. I showed this to a WC pax one year in the Golden Door pool . SHE CCOULD NOT PUT HER HEAD BELOW WATER. Now for making your way through burning fuel oil, debris, ets...Cant tell you......That takes a two week training course!