Author Topic: QE2 - her power plant; lighting, heating and all the rest of it  (Read 2269 times)

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Online Twynkle

Sean - can you elaborate further?  I don't remember hearing about this... was propulsion lost, or just some electrical power?  Losing propulsion in the middle of the Atlantic wouldn't be much fun at all!

Still wondering about this....

What happened on QE2 when there were power outages, when 'the lights went out'?
There are many places on board where it could have been ok, I s'pose.

Did she have a supply of small emergency gennies?

Complete darkness is something I used to wonder about a lot as a child, memories of the enforced black-outs etc
I don't remember anywhere being completely dark on QE2...
And all those light bulbs on board, just the thinking of doing an inventory of the spares she will have carried is awesome!  
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.

Offline Rod

QE 2 had 2 emergency generators on 2 deck aft. They supplied enough power for basic services 30% lighting a sanitary/fire pump, bilge pumps and the stuff needed to start it up again.
When  the ship was steam turbine, turbines had to be rotated by hand if we lost power so they cooled down evenly. Under normal shutdown conditions it would be done by electric motors. There would be no ventilation of any sort. ANYWHERE!
Once the cause of the blackout was established and fixed then the startup process would begin. As power became available then services would be bought back gradually. Wardroom fridge was one of the first things....kidding!
Never happened to me after we went deisel electric.
Usually in the event of a blackout non engine staff would volunteer to help where they could as temps in the engine room rose very rapidly and it would be 10 mins work ten mins rest. I do not miss that part of it.
Dont forget that the motor that supplied air to 1 boiler weighed over 3 tons...that took alot of gene power. No air...no boiler. I have seen them started on natural draught but that carried a big risk of explosions.

Offline Adam Hodson

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Once the cause of the blackout was established and fixed then the startup process would begin.

Hi Rod - What kind of things were the most common causes of blackouts?
"The QE2 is one of the last great transatlantic liners, and arguably the most famous liner in the world"

"QE2 and Concorde, a partnership that lasted almost 30 years... two stunning pieces of engineering, never to be forgotten!"

Offline Rod

Sorry Adam I missed this.

Rough weather did it a couple of times. Because of the movement of water in the boilers ,,,sensors thought they were empty and shut down, human error, jellyfish, mechanical failure and Murphy's Law.

Online Twynkle

Hi Rod,

Do you think it might be worth looking at the official procedures during a power outage 'back in the day…'?
Was it treated as if it was a Code 'something or other' - i.e did it mean waking the Chief, 'stopping all the valves', don't flush the WCs and/or other even more drastic measures?!
Hope this won't get me the sack  ;) !
Rosie
QE2 had been waiting alongside in Dubai for nearly 12 years.  Please restore her Lifeboats and Tenders to where they truly belong - she looks naked without them - please spare her this ignominy.