Author Topic: Accidents and mishaps at sea  (Read 120886 times)

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Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #150 on: Mar 28, 2016, 03:45 PM »
"When I asked for a gap between the stacks, this is NOT what I meant!!!"

Skilly

Loadmaster, you had one job!
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #151 on: Apr 25, 2016, 08:13 AM »
This CCTV clip has been posted on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/_youhadonejob1/status/724420084203159552

I am wondering where and when this was and what happened to cause this?
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #152 on: Apr 25, 2016, 11:28 AM »
Hi Pete,

I (safely) disembarked a seismic research ship at this wharf 4 years later. A lovely little port in South Australia, with a couple of great local pubs!
It looks like I will have another 12 months on my current ship, then the next vessel (a bigger bulk carrier) will have a slow-speed diesel like the one described in the mishap below. Except, this new ship will have a CPP, so the engine doesn't have to reverse direction for the ship to go astern, which makes collisions far less likely :-\

Cheers

Skilly

Report follows:

What happened

At about 1450 on 8 October 2010, the partially loaded Liberian registered bulk carrier Grand Rodosi collided with the Australian fishing vessel Apollo S in Port Lincoln, South Australia. As a result of the collision, Apollo S, which was unmanned, was crushed against the wharf and sank shortly afterwards. Grand Rodosi sustained several relatively small holes in its bow shell plating.

What the ATSB found

The ATSB investigation found that, despite the pilot ordering astern movements, the ship's main engine did not run astern in the 5 minutes leading up to the collision. The chief engineer, who was operating the main engine start/fuel lever in the engine room control room, did not allow sufficient time for starting air to stop the ahead running engine. Consequently, when fuel was introduced into the engine, it continued to run ahead, despite the astern telegraph orders.

The investigation also found that the chief engineer's mistake was not identified by anyone on the ship's bridge or in the engine room control room until after the collision; that the master/pilot information exchange was less than optimal; and that bridge resource management principles could have been better applied during the passage to the berth.

What has been done as a result

Newlead Bulkers, the ship's managers, have amended their on board procedures to ensure crew monitor the direction of main engine turning after each engine order. They have also increased awareness through their fleet about this type of incident occurring.

Flinders Ports, the provider of pilotage services in Port Lincoln, have revised their risk assessment for the manoeuvre being undertaken during Grand Rodosi's berthing to include new preventative, as well as restorative, measures to be followed. Flinders Ports has also revised the port's pilotage passage plan to include indicative courses to be followed, both while transiting the channel and outside of it, and speed zones. This will enable the crews of visiting ship to be better informed about the pilotage passage their ship is about to undertake.

Safety message

It is of paramount importance that pilots and ships' crews maintain awareness of main engine movements and check engine tachometers following every movement to ensure that the engine is operating in the desired direction. This is particularly important when main engines are being operated in manual control.

In addition, pilots and the bridge teams should ensure that all the necessary information is exchanged at the beginning of a pilotage, including courses to be followed and speeds at critical positions during the passage to or from the berth/anchorage, so that all members involved in the pilotage have a shared mental model and therefore, a good understand of the pilotage before it begins.

General details (edited)

Date of event: 08 Oct 2010 
Report Release date: 13 Sep 2012 
Highest injury level: None 
Vessel 1 details: Grand Rodosi - Flag:Liberia - IMO Number: 8800327 - Bulk carrier - Damage to Vessel: Minor 

Vessel 2 details: Apollo S - Flag: Australia - IMO Number: 0634 - Steel fishing vessel - Damage to Vessel: Destroyed

Offline Twynkle

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #153 on: Apr 25, 2016, 11:35 PM »
While we are on the subject of accidents,
hopefully this pilot would have been OK?
Scroll down to short video,  "Pilot (fall)"
https://www.facebook.com/marina.mercante2/?fref=nf

Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #154 on: Apr 25, 2016, 11:36 PM »
Thanks - I never expected such a quick and detailed answer.  This forum never ceases to amaze when it comes to turning up with the goods.  :)
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Offline June Ingram

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #155 on: Apr 26, 2016, 03:12 AM »
While we are on the subject of accidents,
hopefully this pilot would have been OK?
Scroll down to short video,  "Pilot (fall)"
https://www.facebook.com/marina.mercante2/?fref=nf

We do not see the pilot being rescued.  He was, I hope...
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Offline Boris

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Ooops! Sack the Pilot
« Reply #156 on: Jun 05, 2016, 12:34 AM »
« Last Edit: Jun 05, 2016, 12:39 AM by Isabelle Prondzynski »

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Ooops! Sack the Pilot
« Reply #157 on: Jun 05, 2016, 08:44 AM »
Costly to repair I would think. 

This news article says it will cost $2 to $3 million to repair the berth.  Another article I read blames the high winds for the accident but you have to wonder why the ship was docking in these conditions. 
http://www.krbd.org/2016/06/03/celebrity-cruise-ship-infinity-hits-damages-ketchikan-dock/
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Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Ooops! Sack the Pilot
« Reply #158 on: Jun 05, 2016, 08:49 AM »
Here is the other article in the Daily Mail that mentions the inclement weather, and you can see the damage to the ship in the pictures posted. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3625026/Celebrity-Cruises-Infinity-ship-crashes-dock-Ketchikan-Alaska.html
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Offline Roy Warrender

Passenger ship QING about to capsize
« Reply #159 on: Jul 02, 2016, 11:09 PM »
Not to sure where to post this news I found it on
Maritime Bulletin Daily June 29
Passenger ship QING about to capsize
http://www.odin.tc/en2016/read.asp?articleID=87

I think it was MSC Melody
« Last Edit: Jul 02, 2016, 11:34 PM by Roy Warrender »

Offline Boris

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #160 on: Sep 13, 2016, 08:04 AM »
« Last Edit: Sep 13, 2016, 08:55 AM by Boris »

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #161 on: Sep 13, 2016, 08:49 AM »
This is tragic news and condolences go to the families of the two men who died.

This You Tube Video gives an idea of the damage.


We were on the Viking Freya in July on a Danube River Cruise. We saw the lowering of the wheelhouse to go under a bridge during the day when we were doing scenic cruising and we thought it was a sleek operation where everyone knew what to do and passengers were told they could stay on deck, but they must remain seated.
« Last Edit: Sep 13, 2016, 09:03 AM by Lynda Bradford »
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Offline Boris

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Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #163 on: Sep 13, 2016, 09:00 AM »
Another link to Daily Mail article that also has a you tube video showing the damage to the river boat Freya
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3783926/2-dead-cruise-ship-hits-bridge-southern-Germany.html
« Last Edit: Sep 13, 2016, 09:03 AM by Lynda Bradford »
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Offline Twynkle

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #164 on: Sep 13, 2016, 09:43 AM »
Wreck of HMS Terror found.
http://bigstory.ap.org/article/a3833f08082d4af2a51838540bd6aa5a/searchers-find-2nd-ship-doomed-british-expedition

This is Fantastic news...Thanks for posting!
The Guardian published this yesterday.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/12/hms-terror-wreck-found-arctic-nearly-170-years-northwest-passage-attempt?CMP=fb_gu

(Also there's a memorial to the Orcadian surgeon and explorer, Dr John Rae in St Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall - Orkney.
He discovered the final part of the North West Passage, and uncovered the fate of the Franklin expedition).
« Last Edit: Sep 13, 2016, 09:47 AM by Twynkle »