Author Topic: Accidents and mishaps at sea  (Read 119942 times)

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Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #255 on: Nov 03, 2020, 03:47 AM »
Thomas, the ship has lasted well because it was built in Scotland! My first 4 ships were all built in Scotland, either in Leith (3) or Dundee (1). It is the last one, built in 1978/79, that is still running - the self-discharging bulk cement carrier mv Golden Bay. I joined it in 1979, the day it arrived in NZ. I lasted overhauled the engine/gearbox/propeller control systems in 2016. Caledon Shipyards built one vessel that stayed in operation for 94 years!

I have served on many Chinese/Malaysian/Vietnamese-built offshore vessels that have developed corrosion & structural problems after 12 months - crap materials & poor design. And when you get a systems problem - guess what - all the drawings are in the native language of the ship builder!

Give me a UK-built vessel any day, even if the propeller design is deficient!

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #256 on: Nov 03, 2020, 06:06 AM »
What a story, Skilly! And I am glad to see the happy ending :) .

The ending was probably not quite so happy for the Master…

Online Lynda Bradford

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #257 on: Nov 03, 2020, 09:54 AM »
Brilliant story, Skilly, thanks for sharing
I was proud to be involved with planning QE2's 50 year conference in September 2017 in Clydebank
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Offline June Ingram

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #258 on: Nov 05, 2020, 07:05 PM »
Great story and photos !
QE2 - the ship for all of time, a ship of timeless beauty !

Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #259 on: Nov 06, 2020, 10:40 AM »
Isabelle, the master actually remained with the vessel for another 13 years! (Died in Tasmania in 2001)

Investigation revealed that when the ship was built in Dundee, the propeller manufacturer sent up the hub, shafting & blades to be installed at the required schedule time. The manufacturer knew that the blade seal landings on two of the blades were porous, and they intended to replace the blades with two new items before launching.

When the blades were ready a technician was sent up to change out the two defective blades. He removed these, and fitted the two new blades, then bolted the hub halves back together with the special-material 'unbreakable' bolts. (You have all heard of 'Unbeakable Bolts' before I assume).  Unfortunately, he set the torque multi-plyer incorrectly, and instead of tightening each bolt to 4,745 ft lbs, the loading applied was far higher. This over-torqueing of the bolts eventuated in the bolt heads breaking off 4 of the 8 large 'Unbreakable' bolts.
When checked in August 1980 at the guarantee all appeared ok. But it was the bolt head failures that eventually led to the blade snapping off. When we dismantled the hub, crack testing revealed the other three blades were also cracked and about to break off too!

Also, once all the broken bits were flown back to UK, Lloyd's Register of Shipping also carried out metallurgy & stress tests on the remnants & re-examined the design. Once they determined the propeller design was defective a message was sent to all ships installed with SMM 'Seffle' design CP propellers, and many others were found with cracked blades as well (including a twin-screw naval vessel here in NZ)! So it wasn't the master's fault - he was being very prudent in testing the prop before we arrived in enclosed waters.

Photos below show other cracked blades. The shaft was ok, but the ship was laid up in NZ for 6 months awaiting a new prop. They bolted a plate across the empty stern tube (the bearings had been jacked out & also sent back to the UK for testing & re-metalling), scrubbed & painted the hull, then dropped us back in the water.

It was really tough - we (5 of us from each swing - everyone else was made redundant) lived in the St George Hotel in the city centre and just wandered down to the wharf each day.
I best not tell any of the stories of what happened while we stayed there!

Skilly
« Last Edit: Nov 06, 2020, 10:46 AM by skilly56 »

Online Chris Thompson

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #260 on: Nov 06, 2020, 01:16 PM »
The MV Golden Ray that capsized in Brunswick Georgia is still awaiting removal. Plan is to cut her into sections and use a heavy lift vessel to remove them.

Online Andy Holloway

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #261 on: Nov 06, 2020, 01:23 PM »
4000 'slightly damaged' Hyundais for sale, buyer take away!!!

Offline Rod

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #262 on: Mar 13, 2021, 01:05 AM »
This has been amazing to watch. They are using an enormous chain saw blade. First section is done.

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #263 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:09 PM »
« Last Edit: Mar 23, 2021, 10:11 PM by Rob Lightbody »
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Online Thomas Hypher

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #264 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:38 PM »
 :o ...steering gear failure with little time to react?

Somewhat reminds me of Queen Mary's grounding in sight of John Brown's during her passage down the Clyde after fitting out. I hope there's no risk of Ever Given breaking her back either in this developing situation as that would be disastrous. I presume the Suez Canal isn't tidal like a river is?
First sailed on QE2 in August 2003 aged 6 years old. Last sailed on QE2 in July 2008. Last saw the seagoing QE2 in person from the decks of QM2, on QE2's last Transatlantic crossing (Eastbound tandem) in October 2008. Visited QE2 in her new life, in Dubai, in January 2020 and August 2022.

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #265 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:44 PM »
It's been stuck for 13 hours.

This has HUGE implications if they can't shift it quickly...
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #266 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:45 PM »
Is she aground at both ends?
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #267 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:46 PM »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #268 on: Mar 23, 2021, 10:48 PM »
It might be a good idea to not send ships through the suez that are longer than it is wide!

https://twitter.com/scottgoblue314/status/1374464881261301773
« Last Edit: Mar 23, 2021, 11:03 PM by Rob Lightbody »
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline Rod

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #269 on: Mar 24, 2021, 12:16 AM »
Ever Given is 59m wide and 400m long. Just at Suez limits.