Author Topic: Accidents and mishaps at sea  (Read 119195 times)

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Online Chris Thompson

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #240 on: Dec 22, 2019, 11:21 PM »
In the far flung future....Carnival Spacelines experience some deja-vue..... :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Offline Twynkle

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #241 on: Jun 20, 2020, 01:49 PM »
Reports all across the media (including newspapers)  regarding crew members and relating to the CMV Fleet. - in lay up between Bristol and Tilbury


https://www.travelweekly.co.uk/articles/375911/cruise-ship-detained-in-tilbury-over-serious-concerns-for-crew

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-53110744

Implications relate  to COVID-19 - Mods, you might think it more appropriate on COVId-19 Topic...?
« Last Edit: Jun 20, 2020, 01:52 PM by Twynkle »

Offline Andy Holloway

Re: Cruising in Calm Waters
« Reply #242 on: Jun 20, 2020, 05:57 PM »
Strange what the media does, that this two year old story has suddenly gone "viral" with old video. 

The Marine Accident Investigative Report is on line with some interesting information and photos.

Pacific Sun is small by present day standards, only 47,000 tons, and quite attractive compared to the new stuff that's out there clogging up the seas.

Hey, there's a name for RCI's new ship... "Clogging of the Seas".

I know this post is a few years old but.... with little else to do this lockdown Saturday afternoon, i looked back at the start of this thread  and found your post ref Pacific Sun!!
Having done 3 contracts on her i can safely say, without fear of contradiction that she was, in no shape or form, 'attractive', be that externally or internally!!
When she changed Flag states in 2010, from London to Malta, it was because she was so totally inadequate safety wise, and had to have about 1000 tons of concrete pumped into he to sort out her stability!! Fortunately i left shortly afterwards, never to return and, instead moved over to Seabourn.
As a service to the maritime community her last owner, a Chinese company, only kept her for a few years and she eventually ended up where she should have been many, many years before - ALANG!

There again, i suppose being on a ship with 1500 Aussies didn't help my sanity much, especially when the ship was originally built to take about 2/3 of that number, with the extra berths being added for the Australian market.
The majority of her trips were 7 days from either Sydney or Brisbane, a day at sea up to Noumea, then Isle of Pines & Vanuatu, back to back and then 2 days back to Aus. Those last two days were always a nightmare as the passengers were given back their confiscated Duty Free the last sea day before turnaround day!!! Durrrr, these are Aussies, virtually all the Duty Free was consumed before we got anywhere near Aussie waters!

The only good thing my time onboard Pacific Sun did for me was to take me to a few remarkable ports/islands, the best two possibly being, Mystery Island and Isle of Pines.  If you've ever been to either of these two beautiful places you'll know what i mean. Isle of Pines especially is what you imagine a South Pacific Island to be, and it certainly doesn't disappoint.

If i can find a few photos of either i'll post them.




 


Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #243 on: Aug 14, 2020, 04:05 PM »
Excellent report on the Wakashio grounding and oil spill disaster off Mauritius and the resultant ecological and economic damage, undoing decades of conservation efforts.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2020/08/14/national/mauritius-oil-spill-compensation/

Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #244 on: Aug 15, 2020, 11:21 AM »
No. This one wasn't 'Ship hits Bridge'.

It was 'Bridge hits Ship' - it was the bridge driver made the mistake.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #245 on: Aug 15, 2020, 11:47 AM »
No. This one wasn't 'Ship hits Bridge'.

It was 'Bridge hits Ship' - it was the bridge driver made the mistake.

As far as I can see, it was the ship hitting a coral reef.

Offline Twynkle

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #246 on: Aug 15, 2020, 05:52 PM »
It is impossible to watch the TV clips of this event without feeling really really upset for and on behalf of the Islanders and their neighbors.

It was only a couple of weeks before spillages that the 38 Mauritians on board the Cunard ship Queen Victoria sent a plea world-wide on a YouTube Video - regarding 'Get us Home'. A few are in touch - and they are on the receiving end of very impressive and difficult reports from home. I heard a few days ago that they will fly out of the UK on August 29th.
There has been no shore leave since February in some cases, the rest have been on board since mid-March.

Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #247 on: Aug 16, 2020, 06:54 AM »
Isabelle - so correct!

Don't know what happened there - I watched the clip where a canal bridge was lowered down onto the ship, but the comment turned up here!

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #248 on: Aug 16, 2020, 11:53 AM »
I'll try and find the original video to which you are referring and insert the link into your reply.

Later : Sorry, Skilly, I shall need your help to locate the video. Could you give me a clue please?
« Last Edit: Aug 16, 2020, 07:28 PM by Isabelle Prondzynski »

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #249 on: Aug 18, 2020, 04:07 PM »
The MV Wakashio has now broken up, and the resulting damage is horrendous.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/africa/experts-sacramble-to-save-mauritius-s-wildlife-after-oil-tanker-splits-1.4331997?

We need to learn to live with less oil... leave it in the ground where it belongs and become more ecological. Rant over :) .

Offline Rob Lightbody

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #250 on: Aug 18, 2020, 06:13 PM »
Its been horrific.  It seemed like they were trying to alert "the world" for a while before it got worse...

We need to learn to live with less oil... leave it in the ground where it belongs and become more ecological. Rant over :) .

That rules flying out!  And ships too.  They haven't figured out an alternative yet.
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Online Isabelle Prondzynski

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #251 on: Aug 18, 2020, 07:46 PM »
That rules flying out!  And ships too.  They haven't figured out an alternative yet.

Yes, we are learning albeit slowly, and it took us a pandemic to teach us. I hope we shall not forget so quickly...

And by the way, there are ships running on gas... not sure though whether that is more ecological.

Online Peter Mugridge

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #252 on: Aug 18, 2020, 09:19 PM »
And ships too.  They haven't figured out an alternative yet.

Well... at least as far as ships are concerned....

There is such a thing as tall ships!
« Last Edit: Aug 18, 2020, 10:56 PM by Isabelle Prondzynski »
"It is a capital mistake to allow any mechanical object to realise that you are in a hurry!"

Offline skilly56

Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #253 on: Nov 03, 2020, 01:16 AM »
Just had a look at the photos being submitted for the December Competition.

With reference to Thomas Hypher's photo of my son showing his father the bridge wing controls - that could never have happened if it weren't for an accident at sea back on August 14th, 1984.

My ship was returning to Nelson, NZ, from Brisbane, Australia. The master decided to test the CP propeller off Nelson before picking up the pilot - I had just sat down for dinner, when the ship started shaking violently!
Raced down the engine room to find the propeller shaft doing wild gyrations by the O.D. Box (this was a 480 mm dia. shaft section, weighed 11 tonnes, and it was very unhappy).

Master wouldn't allow prop clutches to be pulled out (don't know what he was thinking??), so, as the ship has a constant-speed shaft (175 rpm only), the wild movements continued for another hour or so!

The attached photos show the culprit, and the damage. One 950 kg propeller blade had snapped off when Dennis went astern to check the propeller operation. The out-of-balance forces were close to 300 tonnes! The white metal stern tube bearings were destroyed due to the forces involved. The halves of the propeller hub were also warped beyond redemption! Stone Manganese Marine in the UK had to manufacture us a completely new propeller! And that new one continued to cause grief until being replaced by another manufacturers product in March 2004.

Anyway, instead of loading the ship for a Brisbane return run, we were towed to Wellington (124 miles) by another of the company's ships. Must have been very pleased to see my wife on arrival as, 9 months later the 'Propeller Twins' arrived (I still have old shipmates ring occasionally to see how the 'Propeller Twins' are getting on). The eldest twin is now a chartered accountant and Blair is C/Officer with Carnival UK. And during his training time in NZ, Blair actually did time on my old ship, whose mechanical failure led to his own existence!

The 42-year-old ship is now delivering bulk cement between Cyprus & Israel, and I still give technical advice to the operators as required.

The bald head in photo 2 is an ex-Queen Mary/Queen Elizabeth engineer with whom I still have regular contact (he'll be 90 next birthday). He has more blades on top than the propeller now!

Online Thomas Hypher

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Re: Accidents and mishaps at sea
« Reply #254 on: Nov 03, 2020, 02:06 AM »
It's crazy the master didn't take steps to avert the situation until it was way too late. Lucky things didn't end up even worse, along the lines of a stern gland leak if that was a risk in such a situation (I'm no engineer)?

It sure is a small world as I mentioned in the photo caption, and a happy outcome of the incident! Maybe I'll work with Blair one day on a Carnival UK ship, and we could recall QE2 and that bridge visit.

What's the name of the ship, if you're happy to say? She's lasted well!
« Last Edit: Nov 03, 2020, 02:08 AM by Thomas Hypher »
First sailed on QE2 in August 2003 aged 6 years old. Last sailed on QE2 in July 2008. Last saw the seagoing QE2 in person from the decks of QM2, on QE2's last Transatlantic crossing (Eastbound tandem) in October 2008. Visited QE2 in her new life, in Dubai, in January 2020 and August 2022.