Author Topic: Sewage Treatment on the QE2  (Read 12035 times)

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Offline Twynkle

Re: Sewage
« Reply #30 on: Aug 22, 2010, 06:34 PM »
Surely the heads on QE2 were true to form,
as well-mannered as the old girl is /was herself...



Myles - little wonder your memories are so important!

Speedbird178

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Re: Sewage
« Reply #31 on: Aug 26, 2010, 06:42 PM »
Skilly,

It is incorrect to say that the QE2 has no sewage treatment system.  It does have one.  A MARLAND sewage treatment system, which was installed by Marine Ventures Limited; tailor-made to suit the limited space there was/is on board.  It consists of tankage that separates solids from liquids, using screening filters, powerful pumps, and chemicals.  Solids "sludge" is pumped off onto honey barges, while in port (or it can be pumped overboard in high seas).  The liquids are pumped overboard after being treated with hydrochlorite-based chemicals; except in US ports (where they just don't operate the pumps -- just keep it on board in holding tanks till they leave port). 

Offline skilly56

Re: Sewage
« Reply #32 on: Aug 26, 2010, 09:37 PM »
Hi Speedbird,

The difference between what you are describing, and what is commonly accepted since the mid-late 1970's as 'an-onboard sewage treatment system' is that 'all' the effluent in a treatment system is treated before discharge from the ship. What you are describing is a system where the solids are removed first, and only the liquids are treated before discharging overboard.

Whether the solids go away in the 'honey barge' (always get a laugh at how the marine fraternity manage to apply names that are a complete contradiction of what they really describe :)), or get pumped out once the disposal limit has been passed, the solids are still totally untreated.

There is a huge difference in the requirements of the two different methods.

Don't know if this will get through - we are rocking & rolling off W.A here at present and the Telstra signal isn't that good.

Cheers

Skilly

Online Rob Lightbody

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Re: Sewage
« Reply #33 on: Aug 26, 2010, 11:46 PM »
Thanks guys!  I have to say I still find this topic bizarrely fascinating!
Passionate about QE2's service life for 40 years and creator of this website.  I have worked in IT for 28 years and created my personal QE2 website in 1994.

Offline Rod

Re: Sewage
« Reply #34 on: Jul 30, 2011, 01:31 AM »
Skilly,

It is incorrect to say that the QE2 has no sewage treatment system.  It does have one.  A MARLAND sewage treatment system, which was installed by Marine Ventures Limited; tailor-made to suit the limited space there was/is on board.  It consists of tankage that separates solids from liquids, using screening filters, powerful pumps, and chemicals.  Solids "sludge" is pumped off onto honey barges, while in port (or it can be pumped overboard in high seas).  The liquids are pumped overboard after being treated with hydrochlorite-based chemicals; except in US ports (where they just don't operate the pumps -- just keep it on board in holding tanks till they leave port). 

Good. I was getting fed up reading garbage from people that do not know.
At the time the Marland system was installed, it complied to the Japanese health laws. Which is why it was installed. They were the strongest in the world at the time.
 With the Marland system, ALL sewage dumped overboard was treated....lets be honest that just means adding bleach.
The system, as quoted above, was capable of storing, selective dumping, or total dumping.

Offline Rod

Re: Sewage
« Reply #35 on: Jul 30, 2011, 10:43 AM »
Interesting point BUT in the C Six book by  Dr Nigel Roberts he tells the story of a well known person who while at the Drs party used was caught short and asked to use his toilet, rather than sucking the contents, it malfunctioned and went whoosh, he was in the toilet for quite some time and emerged some time later somewhat flustered to say the least.
 Though no name is mentioned l wondered if it was Jimmy Carter, that name seemed to be doing the rounds at that time, Well over 20 years ago.  
 The first time l experienced one of those contraptions was on a P&O ferry, in the confines of my own cabin and having observed the "warning please close the toilet seat before flushing" The above tale came racing back to me and l did what any decent,sane person would do, Closed the seat and stood on it while pressing the flush button. I felt enormously stupid doing such a thing :-[ and took comfort that no one would see me.. :-X But what surprised me was the noise it made, had l not gone when l did l would have probably gone right then, mercifully they seemed to have tamed down since those days. But l still dont like them

This was called "Getting your own back"

The flush valve had a leather cup washer on the piston to regulate its closing speed. If the leather got hard or torn , the valve would open fully immediately, causing almost an explosion of sea water, with the obvious consequences. It could also cause burst pipes as the valves slammed shut, outting full pressure back on the system. Most of the "Niagra, Niagra" calls were caused by banging flush valves.

It is a fascinating subject...now lets get on to waste in space!